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Enthusiast

UCCX Generated Prompt with different types of generator types

I am looking for a way to create a generated prompt that will have upper case, lower case, numbers and special characters in the string.  Is there a way to do that so it plays it back correctly to the caller?  This would be a randomly generated password.

 

So it could be something like "nt35#%TNq".  I would want it to play:

 

lower case n

lower case t

3

5

pound or hash sign

percentage sign

upper case or capital T

upper case or capital N

lower case q

 

Thanks,

Chris

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Highlighted
Enthusiast

How are you generating the password?

And, how are you applying the presented password to the password management tool or Active Directory?

 

I believe, the system (default) prompts are limited to the pronunciation of the character. The letter 'a' is pronounced the same way as 'A'. There's no difference in the eyes of the system. However, you could analyze each character within the password and identify the case. Try this...

 

Add the following variables;

newPwd, string, "nt35#%TNq "

charToPlay, char, '\0'

charCounter, int, 0

pUppercase, prompt, [record prompt]

     > The prompt would say, "Uppercase"

 

Next, insert the following steps in this order;

On Exception (ExpressionException) Goto ExpressionExcpt

[Label] PwdLoop 

Delay 1 sec

Set charToPlay = newPwd.charAt( charCounter )

Increment charCounter

IF (charCounter < 10) Then

   True

       IF (char.isUpperCase( charToPlay )) Then

          True

              Play Prompt (-Triggering Contact-, P[pUppercase] + S[charToPlay] )

              GoTo PwdLoop

           False

              Play Prompt (-Triggering Contact-, S[charToPlay] )

              GoTo PwdLoop     

   False

      [Annotate] -Continue-

[Label] ExpressionExcpt

Clear Exception (ExpressionException)

 

Assuming your password is less than 10 characters... it's going to throw the Expression Exception. Make sure you clear this exception to avoid "endless" loops.

The 1 sec delay provides a small buffer between each character.

And, only uppercase characters would be idenify as "Uppercase A". Lowercase would be simply "a". Users should understand when you don't identify the case, it's a lowercase character - hopefully.

 

There's probably a dozen ways to script this, each slightly different but the end results would be the same. Good luck!!!

View solution in original post

2 REPLIES 2
Highlighted
Enthusiast

How are you generating the password?

And, how are you applying the presented password to the password management tool or Active Directory?

 

I believe, the system (default) prompts are limited to the pronunciation of the character. The letter 'a' is pronounced the same way as 'A'. There's no difference in the eyes of the system. However, you could analyze each character within the password and identify the case. Try this...

 

Add the following variables;

newPwd, string, "nt35#%TNq "

charToPlay, char, '\0'

charCounter, int, 0

pUppercase, prompt, [record prompt]

     > The prompt would say, "Uppercase"

 

Next, insert the following steps in this order;

On Exception (ExpressionException) Goto ExpressionExcpt

[Label] PwdLoop 

Delay 1 sec

Set charToPlay = newPwd.charAt( charCounter )

Increment charCounter

IF (charCounter < 10) Then

   True

       IF (char.isUpperCase( charToPlay )) Then

          True

              Play Prompt (-Triggering Contact-, P[pUppercase] + S[charToPlay] )

              GoTo PwdLoop

           False

              Play Prompt (-Triggering Contact-, S[charToPlay] )

              GoTo PwdLoop     

   False

      [Annotate] -Continue-

[Label] ExpressionExcpt

Clear Exception (ExpressionException)

 

Assuming your password is less than 10 characters... it's going to throw the Expression Exception. Make sure you clear this exception to avoid "endless" loops.

The 1 sec delay provides a small buffer between each character.

And, only uppercase characters would be idenify as "Uppercase A". Lowercase would be simply "a". Users should understand when you don't identify the case, it's a lowercase character - hopefully.

 

There's probably a dozen ways to script this, each slightly different but the end results would be the same. Good luck!!!

View solution in original post

Highlighted

Thank you for the response.  I basically did what you suggested and looks like we are good to go.

 

Screen Shot 2017-11-09 at 2.28.38 PM.pngScreen Shot 2017-11-09 at 2.28.33 PM.png