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UCCX IVR License-annoying

Hi, 

 

Premium license is so annoying. cisco tells you it is 1:2 yet I think it is not.

 

I have a call center licensed for 100 seats which should mean 200 IVR ports but the license utilization tells me otherwise. it shows that the total number of inbound IVR does not exceed 100 while the inbound seats range from  11 to 60 leaving around 40 IVR ports unused. which contradicts what we understand from cisco's documentation. what I understood from cisco's license docs is that it utilizes unused ports for example in my case it should use 140 IVR ports when there are 60 seats utilized.

 

I need a clear answer for this its causing trouble with a client 

 

 

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VIP Advisor

Re: UCCX IVR License-annoying

In order to understand this, you're going to have to separate a few ideas from one another.

 

This all has to do with Premium, as Enhanced and Standard work differently.

 

#1 - Licensed Limits
When you want to login an Agent, there needs to be a license available for them to login, else they'll not be able to login. Simple. So, you purchase 1 license (aka Seat), upload it to the server, and login this Agent. At the same time, you also just licensed 2 IVR ports with that single Agent license. So, in theory, the solution is supporting 3 total calls now: 1 caller speaking to the logged in Agent, and 2 callers waiting in queue to speak to the logged in Agent. The 4th call that comes into the system, will be rejected, due to a license violation. Cisco strictly enforces the licensing on UCCX, so you must always respect it.

 

#2 - Server Capacity
There are only 3 sizes of servers to deploy:

 

  1. Small: 100 Agents & 100 Ports
  2. Medium: 300 Agents & 300 Ports
  3. Large: 400 Agents & 400 Ports

You may already notice a problem here, which is, if the licensing model is 1:2 for Agent:Port, then if you license any of these systems for 50% of the total Agent limit, then you've hit 100% of the port limit. E.g., Purchasing 50 Seats on a small system, will license 100 Ports. Then, if you apply just 1 more seat license to the system, you will not be able to use 101 ports. You effectively lose money by licensing the system any higher than 50% of the total capacity.

 

You can change the size of your system, but you must meet the correct hardware specs for that system, and it does require you to backup, reinstall, and restore the system to do so.  You cannot just "add more CPUs and RAM" to an already installed system.  Also, if you're running something called a Business Edition 6000, you can only run the small system size.

 

#3 - Configuration
Configuring Agents is probably straight forward to you. You build a phone in CUCM, create their user account, train them, etc. However, what you might not be aware of is that you also need to configure the Ports themselves, which are CTI Ports in CUCM, but built from the UCCX AppAdmin GUI as Call Control Groups (CCG). If you license your small server for 50 Seats, and expect to be able to use 100 Ports, but only configured 30 CTI Ports, then technically your limit is 30 ports, not 100. Conversely, you could configure 130 CTI ports, but the licensing police will only allow you to use 100 at a time, thus you gain little, if any benefit from configuring more ports than you're licensed for.

 

One more item related to configuration is an arbitrary session limit on Applications and Triggers. If you have a small server with 50 licenses, and 100 CTI ports configured, but your Application has a session limit of 10, then you'll only be able to process 10 calls at a time. The 11th call will be rejected. Likewise, your Triggers have session limits you can set on them too. So a Trigger on that 10 session app I just mentioned, if it then has a 5 session limit, then 5 calls is your max, the 6th will be rejected.

All three of these factors are checked when the system is trying to answer a call. I don't specifically no the order in which it attempts to check these items, but I'd imagine it's something like this:

 

1) CUCM presents the call to a CTI Route Point (aka UCCX Trigger)
2) UCCX checks if the Trigger has spare sessions, else reject the call
3) UCCX checks if the Application has spare sessions, else reject the call
4) UCCX checks if there is an available CTI port in the CCG assocaited to the Trigger, else reject the call
5) UCCX checks if there is an available license on the system, else reject the call
6) UCCX answers the call

 

Note that I didn't write a check for UCCX to see if the hardware size is maxed out, because technically this is already handled by the licenses. I.e., You cannot license a small system for 101 ports, so checking if the system size is being over tasked, is done by a simple check on the license usage.

 

So, we know you have 60 seats and thus are entitled to 120 ports, but what size system do you have installed, and how many CTI Ports are in your CCG associated to your trigger, and then how many sessions are on that trigger, followed by how many sessions on your Application?

 

If you were to fill out this table, then the smallest number in the table is your limit:

 

Area of Limitation Value
Server Size 100 (example value)
IVR Port Licenses 120 (your value)
Size of CCG 75 (example value)
Application Session Count 50 (example value)
Trigger Session Count 50 (example value)
Maximum Concurrent Calls Possible 50 (this leaves 70 IVR port licenses unused)

 

This can get really complicated with multiple CCGs, or Applications with different session counts, and finally multiple triggers on the same Application, each with different trigger counts.

 

EDIT: For enhanced and standard, you basically don't license the IVR ports at all, and the only limit is the system size.  Another way to think of it, is that you get 100% of the IVR port licenses your system size can handle for free.  Everything else should be the same for as it is for Premium.


Anthony Holloway

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7 REPLIES 7
Enthusiast

Re: UCCX IVR License-annoying

With CCX Premium, you get 2 IVR ports for every 1 agent license. If you look at System > Licensing Information > Display License, it should hsow the accurate count. 1 agent on a call does not eman 2 ports are in use.
For IVR ports, This means that you can have up to 200 concurrent calls being processed by CCX IVR engine, such as listening to greetings or waiting in queue.

If you have peaked at 60 inbound agents, and never exceeded 100 IVR ports, what problem is it causing. The actual usage is not 1:2. You can have all 60 seats in use / on a call, and only 20 other IVR ports in use because there are only 20 calls in queue. That would not break 100 ports in use.
Highlighted

Re: UCCX IVR License-annoying

Thank you for replying 

 

The number of call hitting the IVR currently is very high we are sure we can utilize them all all day

the question is what is the case if we have inbound 60 seats utilized and the other 140 IVR ports available for the massive amount of calls we receive. and we have 100 seat *2 (200IVR ports) will the system utilize 140 IVR ports or 100

this is confusing. I would highly appreciate the help 

VIP Advisor

Re: UCCX IVR License-annoying

In order to understand this, you're going to have to separate a few ideas from one another.

 

This all has to do with Premium, as Enhanced and Standard work differently.

 

#1 - Licensed Limits
When you want to login an Agent, there needs to be a license available for them to login, else they'll not be able to login. Simple. So, you purchase 1 license (aka Seat), upload it to the server, and login this Agent. At the same time, you also just licensed 2 IVR ports with that single Agent license. So, in theory, the solution is supporting 3 total calls now: 1 caller speaking to the logged in Agent, and 2 callers waiting in queue to speak to the logged in Agent. The 4th call that comes into the system, will be rejected, due to a license violation. Cisco strictly enforces the licensing on UCCX, so you must always respect it.

 

#2 - Server Capacity
There are only 3 sizes of servers to deploy:

 

  1. Small: 100 Agents & 100 Ports
  2. Medium: 300 Agents & 300 Ports
  3. Large: 400 Agents & 400 Ports

You may already notice a problem here, which is, if the licensing model is 1:2 for Agent:Port, then if you license any of these systems for 50% of the total Agent limit, then you've hit 100% of the port limit. E.g., Purchasing 50 Seats on a small system, will license 100 Ports. Then, if you apply just 1 more seat license to the system, you will not be able to use 101 ports. You effectively lose money by licensing the system any higher than 50% of the total capacity.

 

You can change the size of your system, but you must meet the correct hardware specs for that system, and it does require you to backup, reinstall, and restore the system to do so.  You cannot just "add more CPUs and RAM" to an already installed system.  Also, if you're running something called a Business Edition 6000, you can only run the small system size.

 

#3 - Configuration
Configuring Agents is probably straight forward to you. You build a phone in CUCM, create their user account, train them, etc. However, what you might not be aware of is that you also need to configure the Ports themselves, which are CTI Ports in CUCM, but built from the UCCX AppAdmin GUI as Call Control Groups (CCG). If you license your small server for 50 Seats, and expect to be able to use 100 Ports, but only configured 30 CTI Ports, then technically your limit is 30 ports, not 100. Conversely, you could configure 130 CTI ports, but the licensing police will only allow you to use 100 at a time, thus you gain little, if any benefit from configuring more ports than you're licensed for.

 

One more item related to configuration is an arbitrary session limit on Applications and Triggers. If you have a small server with 50 licenses, and 100 CTI ports configured, but your Application has a session limit of 10, then you'll only be able to process 10 calls at a time. The 11th call will be rejected. Likewise, your Triggers have session limits you can set on them too. So a Trigger on that 10 session app I just mentioned, if it then has a 5 session limit, then 5 calls is your max, the 6th will be rejected.

All three of these factors are checked when the system is trying to answer a call. I don't specifically no the order in which it attempts to check these items, but I'd imagine it's something like this:

 

1) CUCM presents the call to a CTI Route Point (aka UCCX Trigger)
2) UCCX checks if the Trigger has spare sessions, else reject the call
3) UCCX checks if the Application has spare sessions, else reject the call
4) UCCX checks if there is an available CTI port in the CCG assocaited to the Trigger, else reject the call
5) UCCX checks if there is an available license on the system, else reject the call
6) UCCX answers the call

 

Note that I didn't write a check for UCCX to see if the hardware size is maxed out, because technically this is already handled by the licenses. I.e., You cannot license a small system for 101 ports, so checking if the system size is being over tasked, is done by a simple check on the license usage.

 

So, we know you have 60 seats and thus are entitled to 120 ports, but what size system do you have installed, and how many CTI Ports are in your CCG associated to your trigger, and then how many sessions are on that trigger, followed by how many sessions on your Application?

 

If you were to fill out this table, then the smallest number in the table is your limit:

 

Area of Limitation Value
Server Size 100 (example value)
IVR Port Licenses 120 (your value)
Size of CCG 75 (example value)
Application Session Count 50 (example value)
Trigger Session Count 50 (example value)
Maximum Concurrent Calls Possible 50 (this leaves 70 IVR port licenses unused)

 

This can get really complicated with multiple CCGs, or Applications with different session counts, and finally multiple triggers on the same Application, each with different trigger counts.

 

EDIT: For enhanced and standard, you basically don't license the IVR ports at all, and the only limit is the system size.  Another way to think of it, is that you get 100% of the IVR port licenses your system size can handle for free.  Everything else should be the same for as it is for Premium.


Anthony Holloway

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Re: UCCX IVR License-annoying

This was pretty helpful, we have a license of 130 seats hence logically 260 IVR ports however,  the used OVA is the 100 Small one so thats why the license information page does not multiply our seat license on the licensed IVR port count it only show 100 IVR ports. 

 

one more question how do we check the trigger and application limits is that on the script or the UCCX gui

VIP Advisor

Re: UCCX IVR License-annoying

You can see these on the AppAdmin GUI in UCCX.


Anthony Holloway

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Enthusiast

Re: UCCX IVR License-annoying

Session counts are set in the GUI. These can be modified any time.
Application Management (Maximum number of Sessions)
Call Control Group (CTI Ports)
I dont think triggers let you set individual counts in CCX
VIP Advisor

Re: UCCX IVR License-annoying

Tirggers have session too. 

 

 


Anthony Holloway

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