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Contributor

CME dial peer pattern explanation

please im having some strange dial peer patterns which i cant figure out what digits they match up with , can someone explain them:

 

dial-peer voice 53 pots
description ** incoming dial peer **
incoming called-number ^AAAA$    ###### what does this match?
port 0/1/3
!

 

dial-peer voice 54 pots
description ** FXO pots dial-peer **
destination-pattern A0 ###### what does this match as well?
port 0/1/0
no sip-register   ###### what does this means?

dial-peer voice 55 pots
description ** FXO pots dial-peer **
destination-pattern A1   ###### what does this match?
port 0/1/1
no sip-register
!
dial-peer voice 56 pots
description ** FXO pots dial-peer **
destination-pattern A2   ###### what does this match?
port 0/1/2
no sip-register
!
dial-peer voice 57 pots
description ** FXO pots dial-peer **
destination-pattern A3    ###### what does this match?
port 0/1/3
no sip-register
!

5 REPLIES 5
VIP Advisor

Re: CME dial peer pattern explanation

DPs 54 - 57 match any thing starting with A[0-3]. These two digits are
striped and remaining digits are send to pstn. There are many reasons to do
this such as prefix digits at cucm with start digits to match certain set
to dial peers then stripping them.

DP 53 matches incoming calls with number as AAAA only.
Contributor

Re: CME dial peer pattern explanation

thank you so much for your reply but A[0-3] the A isnt a digit but a letter so how it will be matched? also in dial peer 53 the AAAA arent numbers but letters so how they will be matched ? that what i cant understand
VIP Advisor

Re: CME dial peer pattern explanation

Technically users can dial the letters A-D, since they are valid, albeit not many phones have these keys to press, but some do! Also, system-to-system transfers and/or routing can have these A-D letters in them, and that pretty trivial.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dual-tone_multi-frequency_signaling

More than likely, whatever GUI setup those dial-peers, is using those prefixes as steering codes, to select the individual ports.

The more common way to do that, is to have a single dial-peer and use a trunkgroup, to group your 4 analog ports together. But, it's 6 of one, and a half-dozen of the other. There's no one right way to do it, just that it meets your needs.

I'd be curious to know what those patterns are used for.

If you make a test call inbound, and a test call outbound, with the following debugs turned on:

debug vpm signal
debug voip ccapi inout

And then paste the logs here, that would be kind of neat to look at.

Alternative, if you just have your call established and use the command:

show call active voice | in PeerAddr|PeerId|RemoteS|RemoteM|Dtmf|Coder|VAD

That will atleast show the dial-peers involved in the call.

Anthony Holloway

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Contributor

Re: CME dial peer pattern explanation

i did the command you mentioned but i couldnt understand how to get the dial peer involved , some output
PeerAddress=BCD
PeerId=20003
CoderTypeRate=g711ulaw

what can you tell from this output?

VIP Advisor

Re: CME dial peer pattern explanation

I'm happy to see that you knew the destination patterns were left justified. I find that not many people know that. +5

Anthony Holloway

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