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Help with Military dual DSN/PSTN access on CP-7942

                   Hi Folks:

Installing a CUCM 8.6.2 Cluster at a remote military facility, cutting over from a VERY old PBX, voice gateway is a 2921 ISR with a NM-HDV2 w/2 onboard T1.   The PBX has a single PRI connected to PSTN and a single PRI connected to the military Defense Switched Network (DSN).  At most military facilities (99.9%) the subscriber extension matches on both the DSN NXX and the PSTN NXX, making it simple to mask or translate the NXX and map  BOTH phone lines to One button.   Unfortunetly this PBX was installed in stages and they created unique NXX-XXXX DN's for DSN and PSTN per subscriber.  Most of the phones they purchased are Two line CP-7942's.  I was going to map the DSN to one button and PSTN to the other button, but they INSIST on having their intercom number on one of the buttons.

Can someone advise me on a work-around to map both lines to one button  that doesnt require creating a unique translation pattern per line/subscriber?

Appreciation to any assistance provided in advance! 

Thanks

PS:  Dial Plan is minimal.  No Route groups or Route lists.  Patterns  9.XXXXXXX (and variants) point directly to the PSTN PRI gateway, and 8.XXXXXXX point directly to the DSN connected PRI Gateway.

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

Re: Help with Military dual DSN/PSTN access on CP-7942

Translation patterns are the name of the game here; however, you can save yourself a bunch of time by just bulk importing them. Here's how I do this sort of thing:

  1. Build one of the translation patterns manually to use as a template.
  2. Run a BAT Bulk Export (Import/Export option) and pull out the Translation Patterns. This will dump the entire translation pattern table to CSV for you.
  3. Open it in Excel. I suggest using Data Import from Text File and marking all the columns as Text at import. This avoids Excel screwing with things that look like numbers (e.g. stripping things down to two decimal places or removing leading zero or plus characters).
  4. Delete all rows except the headers and your template row.
  5. Type in your remaining patterns and DDI, then copy/paste all the other columns.
  6. Save it over the same CSV file you pulled down, then TAR it and the header file back up (not zip, a tar file). Use 7-zip to do this if you lack a tar utility on Windows.
  7. Run a bat import.

The second challange is the ANI: if you set the DN as the PSTN number and translate the DSN it, a user dialing into the DSN would have an ANI that the called party may not recognize or be able to dial back. You could either update whatever call routing mechanism is powering the DSN (gatekeeper I would guess) to know about the PSTN NXX; or, use Calling Party Transformations on the DSN PRI port which essentially is the inverse of your first translation pattern. Again, these can be bulk export/imported to save yourself some time.

PS- Be careful with multiple PRIs connecting to different equipment in the same NM-HDV2; the DSPs within it will only be able to sync up to one of the two clock sources. You will get clock slips on the other PRI which may impact audio quality and will render fax/modem calls unworkable. Normally the way this gets designed is to put one clock source on the mainboard EHWIC slots/PVDM3 slots, and each additional clock source on a unique NM-HDV2 with local PVDM2s and to disable DSP sharing (no dspfarm).

Please remember to rate helpful responses and identify helpful or correct answers.

1 REPLY 1

Re: Help with Military dual DSN/PSTN access on CP-7942

Translation patterns are the name of the game here; however, you can save yourself a bunch of time by just bulk importing them. Here's how I do this sort of thing:

  1. Build one of the translation patterns manually to use as a template.
  2. Run a BAT Bulk Export (Import/Export option) and pull out the Translation Patterns. This will dump the entire translation pattern table to CSV for you.
  3. Open it in Excel. I suggest using Data Import from Text File and marking all the columns as Text at import. This avoids Excel screwing with things that look like numbers (e.g. stripping things down to two decimal places or removing leading zero or plus characters).
  4. Delete all rows except the headers and your template row.
  5. Type in your remaining patterns and DDI, then copy/paste all the other columns.
  6. Save it over the same CSV file you pulled down, then TAR it and the header file back up (not zip, a tar file). Use 7-zip to do this if you lack a tar utility on Windows.
  7. Run a bat import.

The second challange is the ANI: if you set the DN as the PSTN number and translate the DSN it, a user dialing into the DSN would have an ANI that the called party may not recognize or be able to dial back. You could either update whatever call routing mechanism is powering the DSN (gatekeeper I would guess) to know about the PSTN NXX; or, use Calling Party Transformations on the DSN PRI port which essentially is the inverse of your first translation pattern. Again, these can be bulk export/imported to save yourself some time.

PS- Be careful with multiple PRIs connecting to different equipment in the same NM-HDV2; the DSPs within it will only be able to sync up to one of the two clock sources. You will get clock slips on the other PRI which may impact audio quality and will render fax/modem calls unworkable. Normally the way this gets designed is to put one clock source on the mainboard EHWIC slots/PVDM3 slots, and each additional clock source on a unique NM-HDV2 with local PVDM2s and to disable DSP sharing (no dspfarm).

Please remember to rate helpful responses and identify helpful or correct answers.

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