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Route Patterns....

Hello,

I ran across a couple of route patterns with no descriptions.  I was wondering if someone could tell me what they are routing?

\+!#

\+!

All replies rated

Thanks in advance

2 REPLIES 2
Contributor

+E.164 formatted numbers both

+E.164 formatted numbers both with and without the # dial string terminator.

IE

+4721490015 or +4721490015# will both route you to Norwegian Air Shuttle - the terminator is just used by some people instead of the inter-digit delay timeout, since the pattern is of unknown length.

Cisco Employee

Hi Angel,

Hi Angel,

See below 

http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/voice_ip_comm/cucm/admin/9_1_1/ccmsys/CUCM_BK_C5565591_00_cucm-system-guide-91/CUCM_BK_C5565591_00_cucm-system-guide-91_chapter_010000.html#CUCM_RF_WB8B14EC_00

Wildcards and Special Characters in Route Patterns and Hunt Pilots

Wildcards and special characters in route patterns and hunt pilots allow a single route pattern or hunt pilot to match a range of numbers (addresses). Use these wildcards and special characters also to build instructions that enable the Cisco Unified Communications Manager to manipulate a number before sending it to an adjacent system.

The following table describes the wildcards and special characters that Cisco Unified Communications Manager supports.

Table 5 Wildcards and Special Characters

Character

Description

Examples

@

The at symbol (@) wildcard matches all National Numbering Plan numbers.

Each route pattern can have only one @ wildcard.

The route pattern 9.@ routes or blocks all numbers that the National Numbering Plan recognizes.

The following route patterns examples show National Numbering Plan numbers that the @ wildcard encompasses:

  • 0
  • 1411
  • 19725551234
  • 101028819725551234
  • 01133123456789

X

The X wildcard matches any single digit in the range 0 through 9.

The route pattern 9XXX routes or blocks all numbers in the range 9000 through 9999.

!

The exclamation point (!) wildcard matches one or more digits in the range 0 through 9.

The route pattern 91! routes or blocks all numbers in the range 910 through 91999999999999999999999.

?

The question mark (?) wildcard matches zero or more occurrences of the preceding digit or wildcard value.

The route pattern 91X? routes or blocks all numbers in the range 91 through 91999999999999999999999.

+

The plus sign (+) wildcard matches one or more occurrences of the preceding digit or wildcard value.

The route pattern 91X+ routes or blocks all numbers in the range 910 through 91999999999999999999999.

[ ]

The square bracket ([ ]) characters enclose a range of values.

The route pattern 813510[012345] routes or blocks all numbers in the range 8135100 through 8135105.

-

The hyphen (-) character, used with the square brackets, denotes a range of values.

The route pattern 813510[0-5] routes or blocks all numbers in the range 8135100 through 8135105.

^

The circumflex (^) character, used with the square brackets, negates a range of values. Ensure that it is the first character following the opening bracket ([).

Each route pattern can have only one ^ character.

The route pattern 813510[^0-5] routes or blocks all numbers in the range 8135106 through 8135109.

.

The dot (.) character, used as a delimiter, separates the Cisco Unified Communications Manager access code from the directory number.

Use this special character, with the discard digits instructions, to strip off theCisco Unified Communications Manager access code before sending the number to an adjacent system.

Each route pattern can have only one dot (.) character.

The route pattern 9.@ identifies the initial 9 as the Cisco Unified Communications Manager access code in a National Numbering Plan call.

*

The asterisk (*) character can provide an extra digit for special dialed numbers.

You can configure the route pattern *411 to provide access to the internal operator for directory assistance.

#

The octothorpe (#) character generally identifies the end of the dialing sequence.

Ensure the # character is the last character in the pattern.

The route pattern 901181910555# routes or blocks an international number that is dialed from within the National Numbering Plan. The # character after the last 5 identifies this digit as the last digit in the sequence.

\+

A plus sign preceded by a backslash, that is, \+, indicates that you want to configure the international escape character +.

Using \+ means that the international escape character + is used as a dialable digit, not as a wildcard.

For examples, see the Use the International Escape Character.

One with # means you dont have to wait for interdigit timeout and will # to send the call.

JB

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