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Contributor

New Site and New ISP Connection

I will be meeting some an ISP at a new site where we need a connection. Excluding bandwidth, type of line, etc. what are some good things I should know or have knowledge about when the ISP comes out to site survey the location. I have done a quick site survey nothing really to in depth, just checking where old connection came in as building is under renovation.

 

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Accepted Solutions
Cisco Employee

Re: New Site and New ISP Connection

The other thing I would consider is how difficult it is to get from the demarc to the patch panel. If you have to run a long way to get from the ISP's termination to your gear, you'll need to consider how to do that. If it's all in the same room, well, then you're golden.

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Cisco Employee

Re: New Site and New ISP Connection

It's so different for each instance. It depends what technology you're connecting and what services. Obviously the physical layout will make a different experience too.

 

In general, you'll describe your layout, your capabilities and you will reach an agreement on what they (and you) will provide. They'll schedule installation which could include requirements for you to make the demarc available, such as installation of a rack or punchdown block, etc. If you are purchasing TDM it would look sorta like this. With MPLS you'll need to consider what services they have and what you provide, technically, such as the requested VLAN.

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Cisco Employee

Re: New Site and New ISP Connection

HVAC, power, physical security...
Contributor

Re: New Site and New ISP Connection

Thanks! Basically I am assuming the responsibility and my main guy is not here. I don't even know what are new equipment will be (e.g. router/device connecting to ISP device, etc.). I have idea of where previous ISP lines come in the building, not much other info. Anything else come to mind?
Cisco Employee

Re: New Site and New ISP Connection

The other thing I would consider is how difficult it is to get from the demarc to the patch panel. If you have to run a long way to get from the ISP's termination to your gear, you'll need to consider how to do that. If it's all in the same room, well, then you're golden.

View solution in original post

Contributor

Re: New Site and New ISP Connection

I think it may be in same location but don't quote me. Chances are, the demark should be near or on same side of building where the manhole is at correct?
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Contributor

Re: New Site and New ISP Connection

Just so I know, how does the technical process normally work when purchasing a connection from the ISP (excluding price agreements and certain paperwork)? They should contact me to provide us the external IP to use to point to them, our edge device or router, etc. So far I know they have asked for a VLAN id for some reason.
Cisco Employee

Re: New Site and New ISP Connection

It's so different for each instance. It depends what technology you're connecting and what services. Obviously the physical layout will make a different experience too.

 

In general, you'll describe your layout, your capabilities and you will reach an agreement on what they (and you) will provide. They'll schedule installation which could include requirements for you to make the demarc available, such as installation of a rack or punchdown block, etc. If you are purchasing TDM it would look sorta like this. With MPLS you'll need to consider what services they have and what you provide, technically, such as the requested VLAN.

View solution in original post

Contributor

Re: New Site and New ISP Connection

Awsome thanks! Basically, we are building a new site. I am pretty new here as well. I have only been part of new site standups a couple times and we actually had a well manned team not short staffed team. We are brainstorming right now. The plan is to have our network equipment in place, have the circuit turned on, begin to replicate data from current site to new site so services can eventually take over at new site/hub, then completely shut down current site. Any good points or anything you can advise me on would be much appreciated. The theory sounds nice but I am sure I am forgetting or leaving stuff out. Systems can't really be down as remote sites still need to access them. That is the main concern.
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