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Beginner

SFP modul for 200 -230 um Cabel

Hi everyone,

 

I am a pretty new in this topics, especially with Fiber optics… but anyway I need to design backbone network for a Plant which is my company building... so I hope someone could support me with this Topic...

-----

I have chosen 1 x CISCO (2901/K9 router)

and 3 x 24 port CISCO switches (WS-C2960X-24TS-L)

 

every switch should be in a separate cabinet which is between 200 – 500 meters far away from another one. Link between them should be 1Gbps.

 

I would like to use this cable: (phoenix contact, item number: 2799885)

https://www.phoenixcontact.com/online/portal/at?uri=pxc-oc-itemdetail:pid=2799885&library=atde&tab=1

-- > Because it is robust and cheap, and because my company has a very big discount by this manufacturer.

 

But if I understand it correctly, here we have core which is 200 or 230 um….

 

 

My questions are:

  1. Which SFP modules can I take for the switch and also for the Router, which could work with this cable?
  2. What is then the maximum length of the cable that I can use?
  3. Is it ok if I have some spare of this cable rolled (on radius 10 - 15 cm) and stored in the cable tray or beneath the cabinet ? (I have heard that this cable loops- spare - is very bad with the optical cable because then we have much more attenuation or signal delays… (?)Thank you in advance!
  4. It would be perfect if I could use SC connector with this module – is there such option ?  ( this one: https://www.phoenixcontact.com/online/portal/at?uri=pxc-oc-itemdetail:pid=2313779&library=atde&tab=1 )  - (phoenix contact, item number: 2313779)

Thank you in advance!

Everyone's tags (4)
2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Hall of Fame Master

1. That cable is not suitable

1. That cable is not suitable for your purpose. You should use a 50/125 micron core cable. The same company makes that, in both rugged and non-rugged versions:

https://www.phoenixcontact.com/online/portal/at?uri=pxc-oc-itemdetail:pid=2799322&library=atde&pcck=P-03-06-01&tab=1

https://www.phoenixcontact.com/online/portal/at?uri=pxc-oc-itemdetail:pid=2799432&library=atde&pcck=P-03-06-01&tab=1

2. If you use the 50/125 cable, you should be able to have 1 Gbps runs up to 1 km (assuming it meets OM3 specification and you use 1000BASE-SX transceivers).

3. Yes a service loop of that size should be no problem. We typically see service loops in the fiber termination tray (behind the patch panel).

4. You need a qualified fiber technician to terminate the bulk cable (long length runs). While you can technically use SC connectors, we more often see LC type here in the US. Either one works at the patch panel though. The jumper to the transceiver will need to be LC at the transceiver end.

Rising star

Whenever reviewing options

Whenever reviewing options for interconnecting two devices via a fiber transceiver, it is a good idea to review the Transceiver Compatibility information for the Cisco networking devices you are considering, found at the following url:

http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/interfaces-modules/transceiver-modules/products-device-support-tables-list.html

Marvin has provided the information that you need.  

6 REPLIES 6
Hall of Fame Master

1. That cable is not suitable

1. That cable is not suitable for your purpose. You should use a 50/125 micron core cable. The same company makes that, in both rugged and non-rugged versions:

https://www.phoenixcontact.com/online/portal/at?uri=pxc-oc-itemdetail:pid=2799322&library=atde&pcck=P-03-06-01&tab=1

https://www.phoenixcontact.com/online/portal/at?uri=pxc-oc-itemdetail:pid=2799432&library=atde&pcck=P-03-06-01&tab=1

2. If you use the 50/125 cable, you should be able to have 1 Gbps runs up to 1 km (assuming it meets OM3 specification and you use 1000BASE-SX transceivers).

3. Yes a service loop of that size should be no problem. We typically see service loops in the fiber termination tray (behind the patch panel).

4. You need a qualified fiber technician to terminate the bulk cable (long length runs). While you can technically use SC connectors, we more often see LC type here in the US. Either one works at the patch panel though. The jumper to the transceiver will need to be LC at the transceiver end.

Beginner

Hi Marvin,

Hi Marvin,

 

Thank you very much for the Answare .... If I may ask you one more Thing, please...

 

So let’s say that I will use the cable that you proposed (for inside installation):

https://www.phoenixcontact.com/online/portal/at?uri=pxc-oc-itemdetail:pid=2799322&library=atde&pcck=P-03-06-01&tab=1

 

with LC Connector, and GLC-SX-MMD SFP Modules….  I see that I can reach max. 550 meters, that should be more than enough for me.

 

I am thinking now on an option to use this cables as a finished ones (with preassembled connector). But then potential problem that could happen if I have for example 250 m cable, and that the line is not so long when it is installed by electrician (lets say - it was my wrong prediction, or changes in the layout in the meantime). So in worst case let´s say that on one end I have 20 meters extra cable which I need to put somewhere, so I would make a loop and put it in the cabinet.

Do you think that it could be a problem considering the fact that loops are not so gut for multimode cables, because different wavelengths will arrive at a much different time to the receiver. (lets ignore the fact that 20 m is too much for a physical space, because I will have maximum of 2-3 such cables in every cabinet, so the space should be no problem).

Hall of Fame Master

We typically don't buy riser

We typically don't buy riser cable pre-terminated. Every installation I have ever worked on had the cabling company terminate on-site. Even then though we leave some service loop. There may be a large service loop of the cable bundle (riser cables are typically 12 or more pairs) in the cabinet and then a smaller loop of the stripped sheath in the tray of the fiber patch panel.

Even with pre-terminated risers we would still use patch panels. Here in the USA we typically follow an installation standard (EIA-TIA 568) that direct us to use cross connects between vertical and horizontal cabling runs (fiber or copper).

However for your service loop, as long as you don't make it tighter than the specified bend radius, it should be no problem.

Here is a typical installation illustrating a service loop in the cabinet:

Beginner

Thanks for so fast answer,

Thanks for so fast answer, but….

The reason why I would like to buy a preassembled cables (with connector) is because I will have only 3-4 of that cables and because of that I am thinking about saving the money, with not paying the specialists for Installation of the connectors onsite... But from such companies I was strongly advised not to do that....

 

Now, as I see you are using yellow cables on Picture which you uploaded, that means that they are probably single mode fiber, such spare Service Loops are not Problem for the single mode fiber, but they are a big problem for Multimode fiber (at least that is what this companies has told me), especially if we have 10-20 meters in a spare- Service Loop....

Could you please confirm your comment is it really for the multimode fiber, and for such big Service Loops, and are you talking from experience or from theory?  :-)

 

Sorry, I´m just trying to make sure that I understood correctly!

 

 

 

 

Hall of Fame Master

There is both singlemode (9

There is both singlemode (9 micron core - Yellow jacket) and multimode (OM3 50 micron core - Aqua jacket) cable in the picture I uploaded.

My comment applies to both fiber types.

My experience with both dates from ca. 1991 to present. Based on that experience I would still strongly recommend terminating the length properly in a patch panel. That approach is consistent with industry standards and makes the discussion of long service loops moot.

Rising star

Whenever reviewing options

Whenever reviewing options for interconnecting two devices via a fiber transceiver, it is a good idea to review the Transceiver Compatibility information for the Cisco networking devices you are considering, found at the following url:

http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/interfaces-modules/transceiver-modules/products-device-support-tables-list.html

Marvin has provided the information that you need.  

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