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Client straight through a router with no switch able to be on VLAN10, somehow?

LateLearn
Level 1
Level 1

Greetings! This is a revision of a previous question.

Is there a way to use sub interfaces on the routers to somehow "trick" the switch into considering the host/ client ( at 192.168.0.1  / PC11) as a member of VLAN 10?

topology.PNG

Just asking the weird question as I go through the study program I found on YouTube.

 

2 Accepted Solutions

Accepted Solutions

Joseph W. Doherty
Hall of Fame
Hall of Fame
Yes, although it's not a "trick". Router (Ethernet) subinterfaces can have VLAN tags. I.e. a main router (Ethernet) interface processes frames much as a switch trunk port would.

View solution in original post

Oops, I need to correct myself after reading your follow on question and your rereading your original question.

A router can have subinterfaces to allow that physical interface to act somewhat like a trunk. Unfortunately, one major difference between a router interface and a switch trunk interface, the switch allows multiple interfaces in the same VLAN while (normally) a router does not.

What I now think your original question was really asking was for a router to operate like a bridge (switch). To this question, some can, although I don't recall if they can support multiple VLAN using subinterfaces or can, while bridging a pair of router ports, support VLAN tagging.

It's been a long time since I've needed to bridge through a router. One of the past terms for this feature was IRB. You might read up on that. Hopefully, someone else, more current on this kind of technology will post a response too.

View solution in original post

5 Replies 5

Joseph W. Doherty
Hall of Fame
Hall of Fame
Yes, although it's not a "trick". Router (Ethernet) subinterfaces can have VLAN tags. I.e. a main router (Ethernet) interface processes frames much as a switch trunk port would.

so my host/client at the top-right only needs to connect to the router it's connected to via crossover? I just have to create a subinterface and make the Default-gateway of the host/client the ip of whatever I assign to the sub-interface and it will act naturally the same?

Oops, I need to correct myself after reading your follow on question and your rereading your original question.

A router can have subinterfaces to allow that physical interface to act somewhat like a trunk. Unfortunately, one major difference between a router interface and a switch trunk interface, the switch allows multiple interfaces in the same VLAN while (normally) a router does not.

What I now think your original question was really asking was for a router to operate like a bridge (switch). To this question, some can, although I don't recall if they can support multiple VLAN using subinterfaces or can, while bridging a pair of router ports, support VLAN tagging.

It's been a long time since I've needed to bridge through a router. One of the past terms for this feature was IRB. You might read up on that. Hopefully, someone else, more current on this kind of technology will post a response too.

IRB.. gotchya I will look into that but yes that paraphrasing is exact to my intentions! Thank you guys for being as potent as you are! Really have been amazed by this "forum".