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Cisco packet tracer

The router needs routing protocols to communicate between/across the network. why don't you need to configure sometime any routing in the cisco packet tracer?

5 REPLIES 5
Engager

Re: Cisco packet tracer

Hi @Muhammad Mujtaba ,

 

If the networks are not directly connected to the same router, a routing protocol or static routes should be necessary to communicate remote networks.

Could you attach the compressed exercise where you have an example of your query?

 

Regards

Re: Cisco packet tracer

when we connect 2 PC's with router in packet tracer and we are not using any routing protocol.But the router needs routing protocols to communicate between/across the network.and we are not using any protocol in connection of PC's with router in packet tracer.

I want just little description of this question.

 

Engager

Re: Cisco packet tracer

Hi @Muhammad Mujtaba ,

 

Could you send me an example of what you describe to my email? lcordova@ciisa.cl

This is to be able to review what you say and give you an accurate explanation.

 

Regards

Beginner

Re: Cisco packet tracer


@Muhammad Mujtaba wrote:

when we connect 2 PC's with router in packet tracer and we are not using any routing protocol.But the router needs routing protocols to communicate between/across the network.and we are not using any protocol in connection of PC's with router in packet tracer.

I want just little description of this question.

 


Routing protocols (or static routes) are needed between routers, in order for those routers to learn about networks which are remote and therefore 'unknown'.

For example, you have a router 'A' connected via a link to router 'B'.

A has a network 192.168.1.0 directly connected i.e. has an interface address which is part of network 192.168.1.0. It also has another interface, which connects it directly to B. Its routing table therefore has the following known networks;

Network 192.168.1.0[directly connected]

Network 10.0.0.0/30 [directly connected]

 

Router B has an interface address which is part of network 192.168.2.0. It also has another interface, which connects it directly to A.

Its routing table therefore has the following known networks;

Network 192.168.2.0[directly connected]

Network 10.0.0.0/30 [directly connected]

 

In order for A to know that, to get to network 192.168.2.0 it has to go through B, and vice versa, B has to 'advertise' that network 192.168.2.0 resides inside it, and the way to that network is via its interface directly connected to A. A does the same for network 192.168.1.0, and its routing table now looks something like this;

Network 192.168.1.0[directly connected]

Network 10.0.0.0/30 [directly connected]

Network 192.168.2.0 via the directly connected interface of router B.

 

When you connect two PCs to one router in packet tracer routing protocol is not needed, since the router already knows that both PCs are attached to its directly connected interface. 

 

Hope this kind of makes it a little less confusing.

Remember to rate helpful posts and/or mark as a solution if your issue is resolved.

Re: Cisco packet tracer

yes, thanks alot for answering me.
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