cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
cancel
Announcements
413
Views
10
Helpful
6
Replies
Beginner

BGP router distribution

i have plan to migration from static to BGP dynamic route, which router model of cisco should i used for more a hundred client connection?

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Hall of Fame Expert

Re: BGP router distribution

Hello Waradito,

so you have 100 remote offices and not 100 end user devices.

if you have 100 branch offices connected to two MPLS service providers using two MPLS L3 VPN services, the central office routers should be two for redundancy.

ISR 4400 may be enough if spoke/remote  to spoke /remote traffic does not need to go via the central site ( any to any connectivity model).

In this case the ISR 4400 must serve just Spoke to Central site traffic.

In MPLS L3 VPN service your Head Quarters routers will peer only with the PE nodes ( peer model with cooperation of MPLS SP) so the number of branch offices is not important at BGP level.

You are going to have a single eBGP session to each PE node and you will receive over it all the prefixes of the 100 remote sites,

So the suggestion is to use two routers in central office to have also fault tolerance for the case of device fault.

Both routers in central office will have two eBGP sessions with PE1 of ISP1 and with PE2 of ISP2.

 

If, the central site provides internet access to all the 100 remote sites, or for security reasons you don't want to allow direct spoke to spoke communication, I think you should go to more powerful devices like ASR 1000.

Two ASR 1001-X can be a good choice,

 

Hope to help

Giuseppe

 

6 REPLIES 6
Highlighted
Contributor

Re: BGP router distribution

You need to take into consideration the bandwidth that you are connecting to the site as well as what type of design you are going to use. For example, if you are going to have one router connected to two ISPs and you only have 100 clients, you may not want to use BGP.  If you are going to connect redundant routers to a single ISP, then you could use BGP with private AS number between you and the ISP. If you are going to use two routers to two different ISPs, then you may want to come up with a different solution for that as well.

 

What is driving the change?

 

The routers that I would be looking at depending on packets per second and bandwidth throughput are the 4300 and 4400 series routers which would range around 150 Mbps up to 5 Gbps throughput.

 

Thanks,

Alex

Hall of Fame Expert

Re: BGP router distribution

Hello waradito,

BGP is needed only if you are multihomed = connected to two or more upstream providers to reach the public Internet as noted by other colleague.

If you have one hundred end user devices to serve with the router I agree that you can be fine with ISR routers 4300 or 4400.

 

Hope to help

Giuseppe

 

Hall of Fame Master

Re: BGP router distribution

When running BGP to one or more ISP you also need to consider what the ISPs will be advertising to you. Perhaps it is just a default route. Or perhaps it is a default route and selected closely connected routes (partial Internet routing table). Or perhaps it is the full Internet routing table. Especially if one or more ISP will advertise the full Internet routing table then you need to be careful about the memory requirements to process that large routing table.

 

HTH

 

Rick

Beginner

Re: BGP router distribution

he giuseppe,

 

i have arround more than 100 brances will connected to my Head office  , each branch will have two  VPN IP/ MPLS connection, so it  supposed use ISR 4300 /4400 routers or higher ?

 

thanks

Hall of Fame Expert

Re: BGP router distribution

Hello Waradito,

so you have 100 remote offices and not 100 end user devices.

if you have 100 branch offices connected to two MPLS service providers using two MPLS L3 VPN services, the central office routers should be two for redundancy.

ISR 4400 may be enough if spoke/remote  to spoke /remote traffic does not need to go via the central site ( any to any connectivity model).

In this case the ISR 4400 must serve just Spoke to Central site traffic.

In MPLS L3 VPN service your Head Quarters routers will peer only with the PE nodes ( peer model with cooperation of MPLS SP) so the number of branch offices is not important at BGP level.

You are going to have a single eBGP session to each PE node and you will receive over it all the prefixes of the 100 remote sites,

So the suggestion is to use two routers in central office to have also fault tolerance for the case of device fault.

Both routers in central office will have two eBGP sessions with PE1 of ISP1 and with PE2 of ISP2.

 

If, the central site provides internet access to all the 100 remote sites, or for security reasons you don't want to allow direct spoke to spoke communication, I think you should go to more powerful devices like ASR 1000.

Two ASR 1001-X can be a good choice,

 

Hope to help

Giuseppe

 

Beginner

Re: BGP router distribution

thank's Giuseppe, its helpfull for me

CreatePlease to create content
Content for Community-Ad
July's Community Spotlight Awards