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Inetrface

KasperDuda
Beginner
Beginner

Hello,

 

I'm beginner in networking and could you please explain if I have interface with 100 mbps in this case I can download and upload with 100 mbps speed at the same time? Or it's means that sum of download and upload traffic? 

 

If ISP Provide for me 10 mbps this is for download? 

 

If my router can pass 100mbps traffic, for example I have base license, this means sum of all traffic on router, yes? 

 

 

1 Accepted Solution

Accepted Solutions

Joseph W. Doherty
Hall of Fame Master Hall of Fame Master
Hall of Fame Master

"I'm beginner in networking and could you please explain if I have interface with 100 mbps in this case I can download and upload with 100 mbps speed at the same time? Or it's means that sum of download and upload traffic?"

Assuming it's a copper Ethernet interface, and full duplex, the 100 Mbps is available to both up and down (sometimes, especially in some sales literature, the link/port is described as 200 Mbps).  If half duplex, the 100 Mbps is shared between both up and down.  For 100 Mbps, copper, likely your port is configured for full duplex.

"If ISP Provide for me 10 mbps this is for download?"

Depends on the technology being used.  Many Mbps (home) connections offer a higher rate for down vs. up.

"If my router can pass 100mbps traffic, for example I have base license, this means sum of all traffic on router, yes?"

For (your 4321, with a performance license), it's the allowance for all the traffic crossing your router's backplane.  I believe that means you cannot have more than 100 Mbps traffic, combined, egress for all your interfaces.

 

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4 Replies 4

Richard Burts
Hall of Fame Guru Hall of Fame Guru
Hall of Fame Guru

When we talk about mbps of an interface that is speed in one direction. Theoretically if an interface is 100 mbps it should be able to do 100 up and 100 down. The reality is that the actual interface speed is rarely the stated speed.

The question at the beginning of the post is clearly about performance of individual interface. The question at the end seems to be about the entire router "If my router can pass 100mbps traffic, for example I have base license, this means sum of all traffic on router, yes?" You might have traffic coming in on interface 1 and going out interface 2 and at the same time you might have traffic coming in interface 3 and going out interface 4. Are you asking about the situation of both traffic flows is 100 mbps?

HTH

Rick

KasperDuda
Beginner
Beginner

Thanks for your reply.

Yes, I have cisco 4321 with Perfomance license, It means that the router can pass 100mb traffic per second. Is it all amount of traffic on the router whit it can pass? Download traffic + Upload traffic from all interface of just Download/Upload?

I am not clear about your follow up question. If the router has the performance license and if that says it can do 100 mbps then I would interpret that to be the amount of traffic on all interfaces. If you have a single traffic flow (traffic in one interface and out a different interface) then I would expect the limitations of the traffic through the router to be the same as the interface limitation. But if you have multiple flows in and out multiple interfaces then the limitation of total traffic would be less than the sum of the interfaces. For example if you have 2 flows each of which is 100 mbps the total through the router is not likely to be 200.

HTH

Rick

Joseph W. Doherty
Hall of Fame Master Hall of Fame Master
Hall of Fame Master

"I'm beginner in networking and could you please explain if I have interface with 100 mbps in this case I can download and upload with 100 mbps speed at the same time? Or it's means that sum of download and upload traffic?"

Assuming it's a copper Ethernet interface, and full duplex, the 100 Mbps is available to both up and down (sometimes, especially in some sales literature, the link/port is described as 200 Mbps).  If half duplex, the 100 Mbps is shared between both up and down.  For 100 Mbps, copper, likely your port is configured for full duplex.

"If ISP Provide for me 10 mbps this is for download?"

Depends on the technology being used.  Many Mbps (home) connections offer a higher rate for down vs. up.

"If my router can pass 100mbps traffic, for example I have base license, this means sum of all traffic on router, yes?"

For (your 4321, with a performance license), it's the allowance for all the traffic crossing your router's backplane.  I believe that means you cannot have more than 100 Mbps traffic, combined, egress for all your interfaces.

 

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