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Beginner

PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Multicast

PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Troubleshooting.jpg

I'm trying to get this Multicast scenario to work for a troubleshooting I'm working on but for some reason it is not working as expected, maybe you guys can help me out. I have Pim Dense Mode and IGMP enable on both R1 and S1. I'm using iperf 2.x to send multicast traffic. Multicast Client (MC) is the iperf server subscribing to Multicast Group (MG) 239.2.3.4:

[root@MC ~]# iperf -s -u -B 239.2.3.4 -i 1
------------------------------------------------------------
Server listening on UDP port 5001
Binding to local address 239.2.3.4
Joining multicast group  239.2.3.4
Receiving 1470 byte datagrams
UDP buffer size:  208 KByte (default)
------------------------------------------------------------

When I do that, S1 receives an IGMP Membership Report and creates a IGMP Group on S1 and an entry on PIM mroute table:

S1#sh ip igmp groups
IGMP Connected Group Membership
Group Address    Interface                Uptime    Expires   Last Reporter   Group Accounted
239.1.1.2        Vlan1                    05:08:38  00:04:52  10.0.0.1
239.2.3.4        Vlan1                    00:02:03  00:04:51  10.0.0.40
224.0.1.40       Vlan1                    23:02:51  00:04:52  10.0.0.1
S1#
S1#sh ip mroute
IP Multicast Routing Table
Flags: D - Dense, S - Sparse, B - Bidir Group, s - SSM Group, C - Connected,
       L - Local, P - Pruned, R - RP-bit set, F - Register flag,
       T - SPT-bit set, J - Join SPT, M - MSDP created entry, E - Extranet,
       X - Proxy Join Timer Running, A - Candidate for MSDP Advertisement,
       U - URD, I - Received Source Specific Host Report,
       Z - Multicast Tunnel, z - MDT-data group sender,
       Y - Joined MDT-data group, y - Sending to MDT-data group,
       G - Received BGP C-Mroute, g - Sent BGP C-Mroute,
       N - Received BGP Shared-Tree Prune, n - BGP C-Mroute suppressed,
       Q - Received BGP S-A Route, q - Sent BGP S-A Route,
       V - RD & Vector, v - Vector, p - PIM Joins on route,
       x - VxLAN group
Outgoing interface flags: H - Hardware switched, A - Assert winner, p - PIM Join
 Timers: Uptime/Expires
 Interface state: Interface, Next-Hop or VCD, State/Mode

(*, 239.1.1.2), 05:09:14/00:04:16, RP 0.0.0.0, flags: DCL
  Incoming interface: Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
  Outgoing interface list:
    Vlan1, Forward/Dense, 05:09:14/stopped
    GigabitEthernet1/0/6, Forward/Dense, 05:09:14/stopped

(*, 239.2.3.4), 00:02:39/00:04:15, RP 0.0.0.0, flags: DC
  Incoming interface: Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
  Outgoing interface list:
    Vlan1, Forward/Dense, 00:02:39/stopped
    GigabitEthernet1/0/6, Forward/Dense, 00:02:39/stopped

(*, 224.0.1.40), 1d00h/00:04:16, RP 0.0.0.0, flags: DCL
  Incoming interface: Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
  Outgoing interface list:
    GigabitEthernet1/0/6, Forward/Dense, 05:10:30/stopped
    Vlan1, Forward/Dense, 23:03:27/stopped

S1#

But that entry does not get propagated to R1:

R1#sh ip mroute
IP Multicast Routing Table
Flags: D - Dense, S - Sparse, B - Bidir Group, s - SSM Group, C - Connected,
       L - Local, P - Pruned, R - RP-bit set, F - Register flag,
       T - SPT-bit set, J - Join SPT, M - MSDP created entry, E - Extranet,
       X - Proxy Join Timer Running, A - Candidate for MSDP Advertisement,
       U - URD, I - Received Source Specific Host Report,
       Z - Multicast Tunnel, z - MDT-data group sender,
       Y - Joined MDT-data group, y - Sending to MDT-data group,
       G - Received BGP C-Mroute, g - Sent BGP C-Mroute,
       N - Received BGP Shared-Tree Prune, n - BGP C-Mroute suppressed,
       Q - Received BGP S-A Route, q - Sent BGP S-A Route,
       V - RD & Vector, v - Vector, p - PIM Joins on route,
       x - VxLAN group
Outgoing interface flags: H - Hardware switched, A - Assert winner, p - PIM Join
 Timers: Uptime/Expires
 Interface state: Interface, Next-Hop or VCD, State/Mode

(*, 239.255.255.250), 05:11:40/00:04:53, RP 0.0.0.0, flags: DC
  Incoming interface: Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
  Outgoing interface list:
    Ethernet0/1, Forward/Dense, 05:11:39/stopped
    Ethernet0/0, Forward/Dense, 05:11:40/stopped

(*, 224.0.1.40), 05:11:48/00:04:59, RP 0.0.0.0, flags: DCL
  Incoming interface: Null, RPF nbr 0.0.0.0
  Outgoing interface list:
    Ethernet0/1, Forward/Dense, 05:11:39/stopped
    Ethernet0/0, Forward/Dense, 05:11:48/stopped

R1#

R1 and S1 have formed a neighbor relationship:

R1#sh ip pim nei
PIM Neighbor Table
Mode: B - Bidir Capable, DR - Designated Router, N - Default DR Priority,
      P - Proxy Capable, S - State Refresh Capable, G - GenID Capable,
      L - DR Load-balancing Capable
Neighbor          Interface                Uptime/Expires    Ver   DR
Address                                                            Prio/Mode
172.17.1.1        Ethernet0/1              05:13:44/00:01:41 v2    1 / S P G
R1#

S1# sh ip pim nei
PIM Neighbor Table
Mode: B - Bidir Capable, DR - Designated Router, N - Default DR Priority,
      P - Proxy Capable, S - State Refresh Capable, G - GenID Capable,
      L - DR Load-balancing Capable
Neighbor          Interface                Uptime/Expires    Ver   DR
Address                                                            Prio/Mode
172.17.1.2        GigabitEthernet1/0/6     05:14:10/00:01:41 v2    1 / DR S P G
S1#

R1 and S1 configs are attached

 

Thanks in advance!

Everyone's tags (3)
14 REPLIES 14
omz Rising star
Rising star

Re: PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Multicast

Hi 

I am not an expert in multicast .. 

IGMP is the protocol used by multicast receivers to communicate their willingness to listen to a particular multicast group. When a host wants to join a multicast group.

- why IGMP with dense mode? dense mode is going flood traffic anyway.

I think you only need IGMP config on S1 and not on R1 interfaces.

There is bi-dir pim command on S1. 

I would remove the bi-dir pim command from S1 .. change to sparse-mode or remove the IGMP commands and test. 

I dont think there is any need of IGMP with dense mode.

 

Beginner

Re: PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Multicast

Unfortunately the setup I'm troubleshooting requires dense mode. I'd agree that Sparce Mode is more efficient. I've added the bi-dir pim command in a try to see if that would make any difference. I'll remove it.

Thanks!
VIP Collaborator

Re: PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Multicast

I agree with OMZ in that I don't think the IGMP configuration is needed  on the routed interfaces on both the router and switch. 

VIP Expert

Re: PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Multicast

"why IGMP with dense mode? dense mode is going flood traffic anyway."

PIM initially floods to all the multicast-routers. IGMP controls whether a multicast router will continue to flood to edge hosts. I.e. if there are no multicast receivers, the multicast router, using PIM dense, should prune. Also, if the switch supports IGMP snooping, only client ports wanting the multicast will get it.

So, unlike PIM sparse, which will only pull multicast when requested, PIM dense cycles through flood and prune. That's not as "nice" as pulling a multicast stream only when needed, but without IGMP there would be constant flooding with PIM dense.
Beginner

Re: PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Multicast

Hi Joseph,

Thanks for your response. That is my understanding as well. Once the Multicast Server (MS) starts streaming, PIM Dense Mode on R1 should flood that Multicast stream down to S1, whether it has listeners or not, or until S1 prunes it.

Unfortunately this is not the behavior I'm observing. When I start the multicast stream with iperf, I don't see that stream being flooded by S1, S1 has IGMP Snooping disabled by the way.
Beginner

Re: PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Multicast

if S1 (IGMP Snooping Disabled) does not have active listeners and R1 is sending Multicast Traffic, how long before S1 sends a PRUNE msg to R1? Also, Would in this scenario Multicast Packets been flooded to all ports on S1 until the Prune msg is received by R1? or S1 would drop all Multicast traffic because it has no members for that group?

 

Thanks in advance

VIP Expert

Re: PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Multicast

If S1 isn't performing IGMP snooping, it would forward multicast, received from R1, to all its port (except the R1 port). Also without IGMP snooping, it wouldn't "communicate" with R1, regarding multicast. Basically without IGMP snooping, the switch, with the multicast traffic, behaves like a hub.

Also, BTW, a prune message would be from a downstream multicast router to an upstream multicast router, informing the latter to stop forwarding it a multicast stream. Switches, with IGMP snooping don't, as I recall, stop their local multicast router from forwarding multicast traffic to them if there are no active multicast clients. I believe they rely on the multicast router to determine that there are no active multicast clients (using IGMP query messages) and for the router to stop forwarding the multicast stream. Of course, the switch wouldn't forward multicast traffic except to ports that have replied they want it. (Interestingly, I recall multicast clients also listen for other clients that desire the same stream, so they then don't need to reply to the multicast router. A IGMP snooping switch doesn't forward the multicast desired replies, except the first, to the multicast router. This preserves the expected hub behavior to the multicast router, but allows the switch to "know" of all the clients wanting the stream.)
Beginner

Re: PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Multicast

Hi joseph,

 

 Thanks for your answer. In this case both R1 and S1 have PIM (Dense Mode) and IGMPv2 enabled, only IGMP Snooping has been disabled. R1 and S1 have a PIM Neighbor relantionship formed thus S1 can send prune messages to R1. I'm just wondering if flooding will occur on S1 before it gets pruned or not.

 

Thanks again

VIP Expert

Re: PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Multicast

Ah, gotcha and oops, I forgot S1 was a L3 switch working as a multicast router.

Rereading the posts, and doing some research on PIM dense, it appears to me, with IGMP snooping disabled, when you start multicast to R1, it should flood it, and in turn S1 should flood it too. S1, as it has only downstream edge, if it "knows" that edge doesn't have any hosts that want the multicast it might immediately send a prune to R1. That aside, looking at your OP we don't see the multicast server pushing the multicast stream on R1.(?)
Enthusiast

Re: PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Multicast

Hello,

You don't need PIM enabled on the switch (S1) and the router doesn't need IGMP. Enabling PIM on the Router and IGMP snooping on the Switch should work. 

Beginner

Re: PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Multicast

S1 is in L3 mode so I do believe I need PIM enabled. Also it seems IGMP needs to be enable for PIM to work on Cisco switches.

Highlighted
Enthusiast

Re: PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Multicast

OK. I didn't know that you're doing L3 between your switch and router. Once PIM is enabled, IGMP is also enabled. Just use IGMPv2 and not 3. Typically, enabling PIM would've enabled IGMPv2 by default, except you manually set it to IGMPv3.

Hall of Fame Expert

Re: PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Multicast

Hello amartinsbrz,

you are trying to use IGMP version 3 for Source Specific Multicast with PIM dense mode.

I don't think the two are compatible.

Either you move to PIM sparse mode and use an SSM address range that includes the group you are using for tests, or you change IGMP version to IGMP version 2.

 

Hope to help

Giuseppe

 

Beginner

Re: PIM Dense Mode and IGMP Multicast

I'll switch to IGMPv2 and give it a try. I was not aware IGMPv3 and PIM dense mode were not compatible.
Thanks
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