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rburrows69
Beginner

Best Soho Router - Split Tunnel VPN

Hi - I'm looking for some advice for a soho router. 

Basically the key feature I'm looking for is to run , what I think is a split-tunnel VPN, so that all internal clients route default traffic out to the ISP gateway. However if traffic is destined for a list of multiple specific subnets (x.x.x.x/24  , y.y.y.y/24 etc) , then it should establish a tunnel to a single remote IPSEC/PPTP host and route traffic for those subnets via the tunnel.   To be clear those subnets (x.x.x.x and y.y.y.y) are not attached to the end of the tunnel - that is a gateway device that will route them further on.

I've been looking at the various VPN router offerings, and its not clear to me whether I can do it with a RV-042 ,  BEFVP41 or something like the SRP521W  else that I need to be able to manipulate the routing tables directly on.

As an extra note, I have complete control over the SOHO end - but merely an account to terminate the tunnel with  (its a service provider).  The idea being I use the public services for 90% of the traffic, but if the clients want to access a specific set of addresses, it will route that specific traffic via the tunnel.

Thanks in advance..

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Gareth Tomlinson
Beginner

On current showing, don't touch the srp with a bargepole.

Adding access to additional subnets via a VPN tunnel is fairly standard, routing will be automatic if the VPN has been established, but you must ensure that

1. the VPN policy AT BOTH ENDS permits your local subnet to access these networks

2. Your subnet does not conflict with other subnets or routes that may be in use on those remote networks

3. Assuming you are OK so far, the remote subnets will need to have a route added on their default gateway to point to your subnet via the intermediate network(s)

Good luck!

View solution in original post

No experience with them I'm afraid. I'm considering going back

to the 800 series routers, which I know at least work correctly.

Best of luck

Gareth

View solution in original post

3 REPLIES 3
Gareth Tomlinson
Beginner

On current showing, don't touch the srp with a bargepole.

Adding access to additional subnets via a VPN tunnel is fairly standard, routing will be automatic if the VPN has been established, but you must ensure that

1. the VPN policy AT BOTH ENDS permits your local subnet to access these networks

2. Your subnet does not conflict with other subnets or routes that may be in use on those remote networks

3. Assuming you are OK so far, the remote subnets will need to have a route added on their default gateway to point to your subnet via the intermediate network(s)

Good luck!

Thanks Gareth.

Any better feelings about the RVxx series?  I'm consider the RVS4000 to be the public facing connection and handle the VPN scenario I described.

My only other option is DD-WRT on some lower-grade router, and that seems to be a bit hit and miss...

Thanks again

No experience with them I'm afraid. I'm considering going back

to the 800 series routers, which I know at least work correctly.

Best of luck

Gareth

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