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CISCO SWITCHES FOR SMALL and MEDIUM BUSINESS

Introducing the next generation of Cisco Small and Medium Business Switches. Cisco is refreshing its SMB Switch portfolio. Click here  to learn more.


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Beginner

Does the SLM224G switch support port-based VLAN's?

I am looking for a simple solution to create two LAN's. One for my own and one for my customers, who will be able to use desktop PC's with internet access. I have only one internet connection (DSL over ISDN) and wil not getting another just for my customers.

My own network should not be accessible or visible to users who are using the customers-PC's. The other way around is allowed, but not really necessary. My setup requires me to hook up the switch to the (ISP) router, and that router just has one LAN port not able to do anything related to VLAN's.

I read about port-based VLAN's here, where it is stated that creating seperate LAN's is just putting ports into VLAN's on the switch, nothing else needs to be done... However, they used a NetGear smart switch.

I checked out Cisco's SLM224G as it is affordable, has 24 ports (instead of 8 for the NetGear) and should support VLAN's. I have read a lot about VLAN's, including:

"- Port-based VLAN's means that you can reconfigure ports to be in different VLAN's. Port-based VLAN's do not confirm 802.1q VLAN support.

- 802.1q VLAN's means that you can tag VLAN's with 802.1q headers to create a trunk between two devices that carries frames for multiple VLAN's. 802.1q VLAN's confirm that there is also Port-based VLAN support."

I known from the spec sheets that the SLM224G supports 802.1q (tagged) trunking. So it should, given found text above, also support port-based VLAN's.

My question is whether it indeed will support port-based VLAN's?

Am I able to use it directly behind my ISP's router and create two seperate LAN's?

If so, one extra question: how are the PC's behind the switch (inside the two VLAN's) get their IP-adresses from the ISP-router? Or will it service only one of the two LAN's and should I install a DHCP-server in the other LAN?

Any information is very welcome!

Thank you.

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Frequent Contributor

Re: Does the SLM224G switch support port-based VLAN's?

Mr. Bertrand,


I have read what you have posted and I don't think the slm224g will do what your wanting to setup.  The reason behind this, if you setup 2 vlans you will need 2 gateways for each network.  Since you only have the ISP'S router and one network.  I would get a vlan capable router and plug it into the isp's router and then you can have up to 4 networks behind your router.  The rvs4000 is an excellent gigibit router that supports up to 4 vlans.  Then if you need extra ports you could get unmanaged switches and plug them into the router for the added ports. 

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Frequent Contributor

Re: Does the SLM224G switch support port-based VLAN's?

Mr. Bertrand,


I have read what you have posted and I don't think the slm224g will do what your wanting to setup.  The reason behind this, if you setup 2 vlans you will need 2 gateways for each network.  Since you only have the ISP'S router and one network.  I would get a vlan capable router and plug it into the isp's router and then you can have up to 4 networks behind your router.  The rvs4000 is an excellent gigibit router that supports up to 4 vlans.  Then if you need extra ports you could get unmanaged switches and plug them into the router for the added ports. 

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Beginner

Re: Does the SLM224G switch support port-based VLAN's?

Thanks for your responce, mr. Carr.

I have read more about vlan's and their setup. I think the article about port based vlan's was lacking some information about the router/firewall. May be it was set up to work with different vlan's from the start. Strangely, in the text it is said that nothing needs to be set up besides the (Netgear) vlan-capable switch.

So, from your response and other texts I learned I needed a vlan-capable router. I have to say that I need to be able to manage a server on the LAN from the outside (internet). I already tried to set up a Cisco/Linksys WRT54G router behind the ISP's (ZyXel) single LAN-ported router and that would not work at all (even when the Linksys was set in router-mode). I lost the connection to internet setting it up that way. I even tried to setup the Linksys in the DMZ of the ZyXel, with no luck. I was unable to set that up with working internet-access form the LAN. So I was not too happy with the suggestion to set up a (second) vlan-capable gigabit router behind the ISP's router....

Eventually, I bridged the ZyXel to get rid of the double NAT/gateway mode of the two routers as routing mode did not work on the Linksys. The Linksys is now getting the WAN-ip from the ISP on it's WAN port and I furthermore used DD-WRT's firmware to enable the build-in vlan-capabilities of the Linksys.

Now I have set up the Linksys with two vlan's and I bought the SLM224G as an inexpensive manageable 24-port vlan-capable switch to provide the number of ports I needed. I devided the SLM in two vlan's and used two wires from the Linksys to the SLM. So the SLM does support port-based vlan's by simply setting up two ranges of ports with different PVID settings. Trunking and 802.1q tagging isn't needed that way. I know I could have used two dumb switches to get two separate subnetted networks, but this way I get just enough ports in a single device where I have ample space to put it.

Anyway, thanks for helping me understanding the way vlan-capable switches work.