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Beginner

What is needed & How to wire switches for stacking

We had a SGE-2010, just purchased 2 (two) SGE-2010P. I want to stack the switches (all 3) (unless there is a better way). Not sure what is needed hardware wise, and how to physically wire the switches. Had switches years ago (diff brand) that used a special cable that connected the switches. It seems that is not the case here. I have not used fiber in networking before so I am new to that part, I’m willing to learn, just need pointed in the right direction.

Details:

The switches will all be in one rack.

Currently we use 100/1000Base-T to all the computers / servers.

Currently 1 switch (2 nd one just died) is connected to the SGE-2010 (LAG over two ports)

Currently 5 servers are connected to the SGE-2010 (LAG over two ports each).

A bunch of individual computers where thrown onto the SGE-2010 when the other switch died.

All the servers and computers are on 1 big happy LAN, all the computers need to access all the servers. No need to separate things.

Side Note:

Will be moving to new building in about a year. MIGHT have VOIP, so I might need to add another switch or two.

Questions:

Can all three switches be stacked, (1) SGE-2010 & (2) SGE-2010P?

I THINK I need to use the GBIC port 4 to stack, I understand 1 port is enough if two switches are used, but what about three or more switches.

What are the other GBIC ports used for?

Will I be better off (can I ) use the GBIC ports LAG (2 ports) to the other switches? Or would regular ports work just as well?

Thanks for you help

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
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Hi Ric,

Thank you for posting. Please see the following diagram that demonstrates how to stack 3 switches:

View solution in original post

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Ric,

Using the regular ports should give the same performance. As far as I know you can stack the SGE2010P with the SGE2010 without issue.

View solution in original post

6 REPLIES 6
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Frequent Contributor

Ric,

Look over the admin guide and repost further questions:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/switches/lan/csbms/sfe2000/administration/guide/SFE-SGE2xxx_Admin_Guide.pdf

Page 20

Jasbryan

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Jasbryan, thanks for the link. I have read most of Chapter 2 in the Administration guide before I posted here. I re-read page 20 (also page 19&21 just in case). I must be brain dead I don't see anywhere on page #20, or the rest of the chapter, pertaining to my questions.

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Hi Ric,

Thank you for posting. Please see the following diagram that demonstrates how to stack 3 switches:

View solution in original post

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Mpyhala, thanks for the diagram. I take it that I do NOT have to use the GBIC ports? Glanced back over the Admin Guide, did not see where it said I HAD to use the GBIC ports, but I have it in my head that I do have to use them to stack for some reason.

Will using the regular ports 24 & 48 give the same performance as using GBIC port 3 & 4?

Have not heard anyone complain about mixing SGE2010 & SGE2010P in one stack so I’m going to say it is OK. Personally I do not see why not, other than watching where I plug in an item that needs power.

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Ric,

Using the regular ports should give the same performance. As far as I know you can stack the SGE2010P with the SGE2010 without issue.

View solution in original post

Highlighted
Frequent Contributor

Ric,

Usually customer use the mini-gbic modules for switches that have distance of 300' + between each other.

The end copper ports are shared with two mini-gbic ports that also can be used with the stack mode.

Jasbryan