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Beginner

Switch to Switch to surpass router? increase Data transfer speeds?

Hey everyone! I'm doing a project for school and i have a very basic question about network device effects on Data Transfer rates. in my project i am just supposed to connect a small SOHO style network with 2 different sub nets. i am using a Asus router (AC5300) with a Data transfer rate of 5334Mbps. i have 2 netagear switchs with DT rates of 10Gbps. my server is connected to one, as well as a few office devices. The other switch has all the home devices connected to it. both switches are connected to the router. the company wants a 10Gbps data transfer rate. if the home network requests data from the server, and it must pass through the router, is that gonna effect my Data transfer rate since the routers is much lower than the switches? and could i connect the switches to one another to avoid this problem ? i am using Cat 6 UTP cable. 

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VIP Mentor

Re: Switch to Switch to surpass router? increase Data transfer speeds?

Hello,

 

according to the specs, the AC5300 has: RJ45 for 10/100/1000 BaseT for WAN x 1, RJ45 for 10/100/1000/Gigabits BaseT for LAN x 4.In theory, if you connect both switches to a 10/100/1000 Gigabit Base T port, 10G throughput could be achievable. Cat 6 is the bare minimum for 10G, 6a or 7 would be better...

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VIP Expert

Re: Switch to Switch to surpass router? increase Data transfer speeds?

If the data will transit the AC5300, and it has a rated transfer rate of 5,334 Mbps, then yes, it likely would limit your transfer rate. (Also, BTW, understand you need to determine exactly what the document transfer rate represents. Sometimes it's a "best case" value, a "worst case" value, or an "average case" [for typical Internet traffic] value. Depending which, and depending on what your traffic "looks like" can very much impact actual transfer rates.)

If Georg's specs are correct, that the ACS5300 only has gig interfaces, then you're not going to be able to obtain a 10g transfer rate unless you had a way to bundle links, and even then, single flows are often limited to using just one link (of a bundle).

Also understand, some devices often have interfaces that can send/receive frames/packets at some bit rate, but sending/receiving multiple frames/packets, at a sustained rate, is often not implied by the capacity of the interface itself.

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4 REPLIES 4
VIP Mentor

Re: Switch to Switch to surpass router? increase Data transfer speeds?

Hello,

 

according to the specs, the AC5300 has: RJ45 for 10/100/1000 BaseT for WAN x 1, RJ45 for 10/100/1000/Gigabits BaseT for LAN x 4.In theory, if you connect both switches to a 10/100/1000 Gigabit Base T port, 10G throughput could be achievable. Cat 6 is the bare minimum for 10G, 6a or 7 would be better...

View solution in original post

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Beginner

Re: Switch to Switch to surpass router? increase Data transfer speeds?

Thats all i really needed to know , thank you very much! 

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Hall of Fame Community Legend

Re: Switch to Switch to surpass router? increase Data transfer speeds?

I know this is school work and I know nothing is Cisco-related ... But this is one good example why this sort of questioning should not be posted here. There are two answers to this school work: By-the-book or "out in the wild".
This is a technical support forum and I have totally forgotten all the "basics" (or by-the-book).
Most people, like us, who help will reply with provide "out in the wild" answers and those answers may not fly with your instructor.
My response is this: Don't use SOHO network equipment for enterprise-grade deployment.
Highlighted
VIP Expert

Re: Switch to Switch to surpass router? increase Data transfer speeds?

If the data will transit the AC5300, and it has a rated transfer rate of 5,334 Mbps, then yes, it likely would limit your transfer rate. (Also, BTW, understand you need to determine exactly what the document transfer rate represents. Sometimes it's a "best case" value, a "worst case" value, or an "average case" [for typical Internet traffic] value. Depending which, and depending on what your traffic "looks like" can very much impact actual transfer rates.)

If Georg's specs are correct, that the ACS5300 only has gig interfaces, then you're not going to be able to obtain a 10g transfer rate unless you had a way to bundle links, and even then, single flows are often limited to using just one link (of a bundle).

Also understand, some devices often have interfaces that can send/receive frames/packets at some bit rate, but sending/receiving multiple frames/packets, at a sustained rate, is often not implied by the capacity of the interface itself.

View solution in original post

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