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rajmohan80
Beginner

AP1200 wiht 802..1b and 802.11g clients

Does AP1200 supports both 802.11b and 802.11g clients simultaneously?

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

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Rob Huffman
Hall of Fame Community Legend

Hi Rajmohan,

The short answer is yes, the 1200 series AP with a G-radio can support both b&g clients at the same time. Make sure that you configure data rates appropriately so as not to exclude b-clients. Have a look at the following info;

With the Cisco Aironet 1200 Series, a single access point can operate one radio for 802.11b/g clients.

From this doc;

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps430/products_data_sheet09186a00800937a6.html

In just a few years, WLANs have evolved from proprietary systems with sub-Mbps capabilities to standardized offerings operating at as much as a combined data rate of 108 Mbps. These high data rates are available in both the 2.4 GHz band with 802.11g technology and the 5 GHz band with 802.11a technology. 802.11g offers backward compatibility with 802.11b devices, but is limited to three nonoverlapping channels in the 2.4 GHz band. 802.11a provides no backward compatibility but supports as many as 23 channels (depending upon local regulations). To provide both backward compatibility and high capacity, WLAN client vendors are migrating to dual-band 802.11a/g-capable client devices.

From this doc;

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/netsol/ns673/netbr0900aecd8035a015.html

Hope this helps!

Rob

Please remember to rate helpful posts.....

View solution in original post

4 REPLIES 4
Rob Huffman
Hall of Fame Community Legend

Hi Rajmohan,

The short answer is yes, the 1200 series AP with a G-radio can support both b&g clients at the same time. Make sure that you configure data rates appropriately so as not to exclude b-clients. Have a look at the following info;

With the Cisco Aironet 1200 Series, a single access point can operate one radio for 802.11b/g clients.

From this doc;

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps430/products_data_sheet09186a00800937a6.html

In just a few years, WLANs have evolved from proprietary systems with sub-Mbps capabilities to standardized offerings operating at as much as a combined data rate of 108 Mbps. These high data rates are available in both the 2.4 GHz band with 802.11g technology and the 5 GHz band with 802.11a technology. 802.11g offers backward compatibility with 802.11b devices, but is limited to three nonoverlapping channels in the 2.4 GHz band. 802.11a provides no backward compatibility but supports as many as 23 channels (depending upon local regulations). To provide both backward compatibility and high capacity, WLAN client vendors are migrating to dual-band 802.11a/g-capable client devices.

From this doc;

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/netsol/ns673/netbr0900aecd8035a015.html

Hope this helps!

Rob

Please remember to rate helpful posts.....

View solution in original post

Rob Huffman
Hall of Fame Community Legend

Hi Rajmohan,

Just thought I would throw in this great doc as well;

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps430/products_white_paper09186a00801d61a3.shtml

Hope this helps!

Rob

Please remember to rate helpful posts.....

One word of caution: Some of the older 123x series APs from two or three years ago had 802.11b-only radios. So if you are working with one of these older models, there is an upgrade path available where the 802.11b radio can be pulled out of the AP and upgraded to 802.11g (which supports both b and g).

Yet another word of caution - if you decide that your infrastructure consists of both B only and G AP's, as in a gradual upgrade scenario, be aware that the G clients will always attempt to associate to a G AP first, regardless if it is closer (or right under) a B only AP. This will cause untold havoc in a production environment, particularly if the application doesn't recover gracefully from a network drop.

The G client will attempt to associate to an AP that is one floor above you and getting a lousy enough signal to unsucessfully transmit data, but not quite enough to want to disassociate just yet, even though a perfectly good B only AP with better signal strength sits just inches over your head.

This is a nightmare to troubleshoot and even worse to remediate, which requires immediate G upgrade to all remaining B only AP's.

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