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Moving up from basic home setup - valid combination?

RunTimeSystems
Beginner
Beginner

Hello,

I've decided to replace my aging linksys kit and move up to "proper" Cisco equipment - call in brand loyalty, but I've never really had any issues with the consumer level units, and I need some more corporate capabilites now that I'm running a SOHO operation.

My requirements are...

  • WAN connectivity to NTL / Virgin Media broadband
  • 3G Backup
  • Wireless (either in built or via access points)
  • Gigabit LAN
  • 12 - 24 LAN ports
  • VPN
  • Optional content filtering / websense type capability

After my initial peruse around the Cisco site, I'd plumped on the 881 - though I can't work out which part number I need (my 3G provider will be Orange, so if it doesn't work with that carrier for some bizzare reason then it's a non-starter). From what I can tell that should give me WAN connectivity to Virgin, built in wireless, 3G Backup and 4 10/100 ports.

In order to get the additional and gigabit LAN I then thought that a SF200P or SG200G 8 / 24 port switch would do the job, can I take it that anything that's plugged into that switch would be able to communicate at gigabit speeds if technically capable?.

The reason for the PoE version of the switch (and I think the router has an PoE option, though the info doesn't state if I need to buy anything extra) is so that I can plug in a couple of the flat panel access points to give wireless coverage. Obviously as a SOHO it's run from from home, so the HP server and other kit sits in the cellar, so I thought the inbuilt wireless could cover that area, we currently use range extenders to try and get a signal around the rest of the house, so I'd rather install a couple of access points and get it sorted once and for all - but they'd have to be PoE.

From what I've described above, am I near the mark?- I'm more of an application person than Networking, so I don't purchase incompatible kit, or miss out any of the "options" that I then need.

Any guidance would be appreciated, I don't mind spending a few quid on consumer kit and then finding it's no good - I suspect what I've mentioned above is going to be pushing the £1000 mark - which makes for an expensive mistake.

If anyone has had good experiences from dealers of that type of kit I'd also be interested in your experiences (can I purchase direct from Cisco?).

Many thanks for any assistance you may be able to provide me, apologies if a pre-sales query is off-topic for the forum, but I'm working a bit blind here.

Regards,

Richard TS.

2 Replies 2

Leo Laohoo
VIP Community Legend VIP Community Legend
VIP Community Legend
  • WAN connectivity to NTL / Virgin Media broadband
  • 3G Backup
  • Wireless (either in built or via access points)
  • Gigabit LAN
  • 12 - 24 LAN ports
  • VPN
  • Optional content filtering / websense type capability

Boy this is not going to be easy.  You'll have to prepare to purchase a router, an AP (optional) and a switch.

Here goes ...

The 800 series cannot support 1Gb to all it's port.  The most LAN ports you can get on an 890 is eight.  So clearly you need to get a switch.  12 to 24 LAN ports could make your selection easier if you provide the specific.  The 3560 has a 12-port model but it's only 10/100.  The cheapest 24-port Layer 2 switch would be the 2960G or the 2960S.

Ok.  Next the router.  I have no idea what your WAN bandwidth is going to be like.  So let's start with the 1921/1941 router.  This router comes in two flavours:  with and without a wireless access point.  I'll discuss that later.

When choosing this router, take note that this may support your WAN but not your wireless WAN.  For that you need a 3G card and you can choose what is  required by your provider here

Ok.  Next wireless access point.  There are pro's and cons' getting a router with a built-in wireless access point.  For one thing the big cons is the location of the router.  The wireless access point, ideally, should be located where your want to provide wireless coverage and not where the router is located.  If you want wireless access point, you have but a few options.  Firstly if you want an AP with internal antenna it's either the 1040 or the 1140.  If you want an AP with external antenna then it's the 1260.  Take note that the 1260 will support antennas with a maximum gain of -6 dBi.

NOTE:  If you have the funds, load up on the DRAM of the router.  You'll never go wrong with a router with more than enough DRAM.

Hi leolaohoo,

Many thanks for the reply, apologies for the tardy response - the wife's been in hospital over the last couple of weeks and my Mother was diagnosed with skin cancer so  IT stuff has taken a back burner to be frank.

Anyway... they've both been told that their issues are resolvable with a bit of a Zorro moment with a knife - so all is well!!

I had a quick look at the 1900 series routers, and they seemed to be modular on the back panel, I'm not too fussed with an internal AP, as I'll be adding external ones on anyway - the external bandwidth is 20mbps, the gigabit was mainly for internal traffic.

I'll look at your recommendations in more detail- this was just a post to let you know that I was back on topic, and that I hadn't ignored your reply which would have bad manners.

Regards,

Richard.

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