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jssalgado
Beginner

Can a Router inject traffic in order to validate BW in an Interface

Can a Router inject traffic in order to validate BW in an 10Gb Interface. In other words, does the IOS include any feature to accomplish this task?

Any idea using routers for this.

 

Thanks in advance.

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Joseph W. Doherty
Hall of Fame Expert

For a 10g interface, likely not.

Routers can inject, if you've activated tcp/udp small services, using something like chargen, but that's low bandwidth.

Some routers used to support a "hidden" implementation of TTCP, but it too would struggle with really high bandwidth.

Manually, if you had multiple telnet sessions, and each was "pinging" using 64KB packets, and minimum timers, you can burn some bandwidth, but unsure whether 10g could be obtained.

As mentioned by others, best best would be some tool behind router that can push traffic.

View solution in original post

Well if Cisco set it's mind to it, they probably could develop a software tool, on the router, that could push 10g on a router that actually can support 10g at wire-speed (in software alone), but when you consider, for example, the difference between packet forwarding in the fast (e.g. CEF) path and forwarding in the slow (e.g. IP process) path, it shows how different the performance can be at the software level.

BTW, congrats on 22 years a CCIE! I believe you can get you CCIE to show on this forums through a account profile setting.

View solution in original post

9 REPLIES 9
Julio E. Moisa
VIP Mentor

Hi

Please correct me if I am not understanding correctly the question, do you want to test the bandwidth received on an specific interface?

There is no a feature on the IOS, but you can test it with a third party tool, like Solarwind WAN Killer or TFGen. 

Regards




>> Marcar como útil o contestado, si la respuesta resolvió la duda, esto ayuda a futuras consultas de otros miembros de la comunidad. <<

Julio: I don´t want to mesure traffic, We are willing to inject traffic to see how much traffic can be supported Thanks Julio.

Hello

Please disregard my previous statements misunderstood your OP - thought  you were querying the possibility of rerouting traffic based on BW utilisation!



kind regards
Paul

Please rate and mark posts accordingly if you have found any of the information provided useful.
It will hopefully assist others with similar issues in the future


@Julio E. Moisa wrote:

Hi

Please correct me if I am not understanding correctly the question, do you want to test the bandwidth received on an specific interface?

There is no a feature on the IOS, but you can test it with a third party tool, like Solarwind WAN Killer or TFGen. 

Regards


performance routing (PfR) previously know as optimized edge routing (OER) can do this.



kind regards
Paul

Please rate and mark posts accordingly if you have found any of the information provided useful.
It will hopefully assist others with similar issues in the future
paul driver
VIP Mentor

Hello

You can automate based on various factors using performance routing (PfR) previously know as optimized edge routing (OER -review it here  PfR



kind regards
Paul

Please rate and mark posts accordingly if you have found any of the information provided useful.
It will hopefully assist others with similar issues in the future
Joseph W. Doherty
Hall of Fame Expert

For a 10g interface, likely not.

Routers can inject, if you've activated tcp/udp small services, using something like chargen, but that's low bandwidth.

Some routers used to support a "hidden" implementation of TTCP, but it too would struggle with really high bandwidth.

Manually, if you had multiple telnet sessions, and each was "pinging" using 64KB packets, and minimum timers, you can burn some bandwidth, but unsure whether 10g could be obtained.

As mentioned by others, best best would be some tool behind router that can push traffic.

View solution in original post

Thanks so much Joseph. This is the answer I was kind of expecting as a confirmation to my thinking and afraid a ROUTER wouldn´t be powerful enough to take this exigency. Thanks again. My name Juan Salgado Henriquez, 22 years active CCIE R&S

Well if Cisco set it's mind to it, they probably could develop a software tool, on the router, that could push 10g on a router that actually can support 10g at wire-speed (in software alone), but when you consider, for example, the difference between packet forwarding in the fast (e.g. CEF) path and forwarding in the slow (e.g. IP process) path, it shows how different the performance can be at the software level.

BTW, congrats on 22 years a CCIE! I believe you can get you CCIE to show on this forums through a account profile setting.

View solution in original post

Thanks so much Joseph.