cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
cancel
1053
Views
0
Helpful
4
Replies
Anand Solgama
Beginner

Different books or one book enough?

Hi,

 

May be my question is silly and nontechnical, but good!!!!!! 

 

Do we need to stick with one book suppose CCNP 300-101 for Cisco RS or need to refer more for smaller topics????

 

One book dont give us full knowledge right so how many we should refer minimum !!!! ?????????

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Peter Paluch
Hall of Fame Cisco Employee

Anand,

Every person would answer differently because it's the difference in how we humans learn about things. Some are fine with just being told the fundamentals and can immediately infer even the intricate parts of the knowledge. Some others need to be led step by step. Your mileage may vary.

In general, however, I would personally always recommend reading more books. Asking how many books are sufficient is not correct - it is not the count of books but rather their combined contents and your own mental work that makes your knowledge to be sufficient or even to exceed the required knowledge. It is up to you to know after reading a book if you feel comfortable with all exam bluprint items, whether there are no white spots in the knowledge in which you do not really know how this or that protocol works or how a feature is configured, whether you have a true working knowledge and you feel like putting it into use right away. There are two very easy ways of finding out how well you know a topic: First, try to explain it to someone else. If you can explain it in a way he/she understands and if you can answer all his/her questions, then you're okay. Otherwise, your knowledge is lacking. Second, find real-life scenarios on the corresponding level of difficulty and try solving them using your knowledge. These forums and Cisco Learning Network (CLN) are of great help here.

Once again, however, the question of "how much to study before I'm ready to take an exam" never can, and never should, be reduced to asking about the number of books to pour over.

Best regards,
Peter

View solution in original post

Leo Laohoo
VIP Community Legend

How long is a string?  

 

One can read/study one book or you can have the entire archive collection.  The main objective is UNDERSTAND.  There are people who can memorize the entire contents of book(s) but give them a router or a switch and they don't know what to do.  I know because I used to work with a few of them.  Get them to talk about OSPF metrics and they'll do just that, talk.  Tell them to troubleshoot OSPF routing issue and they'll feign sickness and leave.   I've met a few people who's gotten CCNA without even touching a router or a switch.  All they do is read the "nuggets" and do computer-based training (CBT) and they pass.  

 

I know I can't.  When I studied for my CCNA, I read about three books (one of them was very outdated) and a handful of CBT.  I had a difficulty understanding the concept of subnetting back then, hence the number of books.

View solution in original post

4 REPLIES 4
Peter Paluch
Hall of Fame Cisco Employee

Anand,

Every person would answer differently because it's the difference in how we humans learn about things. Some are fine with just being told the fundamentals and can immediately infer even the intricate parts of the knowledge. Some others need to be led step by step. Your mileage may vary.

In general, however, I would personally always recommend reading more books. Asking how many books are sufficient is not correct - it is not the count of books but rather their combined contents and your own mental work that makes your knowledge to be sufficient or even to exceed the required knowledge. It is up to you to know after reading a book if you feel comfortable with all exam bluprint items, whether there are no white spots in the knowledge in which you do not really know how this or that protocol works or how a feature is configured, whether you have a true working knowledge and you feel like putting it into use right away. There are two very easy ways of finding out how well you know a topic: First, try to explain it to someone else. If you can explain it in a way he/she understands and if you can answer all his/her questions, then you're okay. Otherwise, your knowledge is lacking. Second, find real-life scenarios on the corresponding level of difficulty and try solving them using your knowledge. These forums and Cisco Learning Network (CLN) are of great help here.

Once again, however, the question of "how much to study before I'm ready to take an exam" never can, and never should, be reduced to asking about the number of books to pour over.

Best regards,
Peter

Thanks Peter Paluch :) 

Leo Laohoo
VIP Community Legend

How long is a string?  

 

One can read/study one book or you can have the entire archive collection.  The main objective is UNDERSTAND.  There are people who can memorize the entire contents of book(s) but give them a router or a switch and they don't know what to do.  I know because I used to work with a few of them.  Get them to talk about OSPF metrics and they'll do just that, talk.  Tell them to troubleshoot OSPF routing issue and they'll feign sickness and leave.   I've met a few people who's gotten CCNA without even touching a router or a switch.  All they do is read the "nuggets" and do computer-based training (CBT) and they pass.  

 

I know I can't.  When I studied for my CCNA, I read about three books (one of them was very outdated) and a handful of CBT.  I had a difficulty understanding the concept of subnetting back then, hence the number of books.

Thanks friend :)