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tommydubs
Beginner

Static Routes with Multiple Hops

Hey All,

I'm learning about static routes now and just cant seem to "see" it when it comes to routing through multiple hops.  I get it when routing network to network (1 to 2 hops), but if there is a 3rd router to travel through in there, I can never seem to knowingly program the route.  So far I've gotten through it with trial and error and get it to work, but when I try different examples after thinking I grasp the concept, it doesnt seem to work. I've uploaded my Packet Tracer project as an example for any kind soul who is willing to take a look :-)

So a quick run down of the scenario, I have 4 networks, connected with 3, /30 subnetted links (forgive my lingo, I hope I'm explaining it right).  Starting from the left, I can create the static route from PERTH to KUALA LIMPUR, and back again.  Same with KUALA LIMPUR to SYDNEY and back again, but what would we be the static route to go from PERTH to SYDNEY (3 hops)?  Maybe someone can help explain it a little better than my texts and sites of that I've looked at... Like I said, when I get it working, I try to follow it and THINK I'm grasping it, but then when I try another similar example, this part always leaves me uncertain.

Any help from anyone would be greatly appreciated.  So far, really enjoying the world of Cisco and hope to be able to offer help down the road to other newbies like myself.

Thanks!

T

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Abzal
Rising star

HI,

If there are multiple routers between two networks these routers must know how to reach both of networks. Just next hop would be another router that closer to the network. But it's hard to operate such network that's way dynamic routing protocol was invented.

In your example(route to Sydney):

PERTH:

ip route 192.168.10.96 255.255.255.224 {IP addr. of KUALA connected to PERTH}

KUALA:

ip route 192.168.10.96 255.255.255.224 {IP addr. of SYDNEY connected to KUALA}

ip route 192.168.10.0 255.255.255.224 {IP addr. of PERTH conn. KUALA}

SYDNEY:

ip route 192.168.10.0 255.255.255.224 {IP addr. of KUALA conn. SYDNEY}

And other static routes between sites would the same logic. As you can see intermediate routers also must know how to forward packets back to source.

Hope it will help.

Best regards,
Abzal

Best regards,
Abzal

View solution in original post

2 REPLIES 2
Abzal
Rising star

HI,

If there are multiple routers between two networks these routers must know how to reach both of networks. Just next hop would be another router that closer to the network. But it's hard to operate such network that's way dynamic routing protocol was invented.

In your example(route to Sydney):

PERTH:

ip route 192.168.10.96 255.255.255.224 {IP addr. of KUALA connected to PERTH}

KUALA:

ip route 192.168.10.96 255.255.255.224 {IP addr. of SYDNEY connected to KUALA}

ip route 192.168.10.0 255.255.255.224 {IP addr. of PERTH conn. KUALA}

SYDNEY:

ip route 192.168.10.0 255.255.255.224 {IP addr. of KUALA conn. SYDNEY}

And other static routes between sites would the same logic. As you can see intermediate routers also must know how to forward packets back to source.

Hope it will help.

Best regards,
Abzal

Best regards,
Abzal

View solution in original post

Thanks Abzal!

I found where my confusion was... I thought that since Kuala had routes to all the networks, it therefore should "know" about the underlying networks and be able to roue accordingly as requests passed through it.  Although Kuala was able to get there and via the interfaces it knows of, the other routers still need to be told how to get to those interfaces as well.  I started fresh and did one at a time slowly, and eventually grasped the concept.

Thanks for your help!

-T