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Basic QOS for RDP

alex-mendes
Level 1
Level 1

Hi,

Im trying to setup a qos policy to control bandwidth for microsoft terminal services so that it will always take priority over other traffic across a link on a cisco 1900 ISR.

Could someone point me in the correct location for a qos novice or give me an example config 

Thanks in adv                 

1 Reply 1

Joseph W. Doherty
Hall of Fame
Hall of Fame

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You might first see whether just fair-queue is sufficient, e.g.

policy-map sample

class class-default

fair-queue

int x

service-policy output sample

If not, then you can try this generic policy, but you'll need to match your RDP (which might use ACL and/or NBAR).

class-map match-any foreground

match

policy-map sample2

class real-time

priority percent 30

class foreground

bandwidth remaining percent 89

fair-queue

class background

bandwdith remaining percent 1

fair-queue

class class-default

bandwidth remaining percent 9

fair-queue

In sample2, be very careful what traffic you match for real-time and foreground.  Such traffic shouldn't be very bandwidth demanding, and it shouldn't be delayed relative to other traffic. The background class might be used for non-time-critical bulk data transfers, e.g. FTP.  Basically, most traffic will continue to use class-default except when you need or desire to prioritize or deprioritize.

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