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Cisco Employee

Check alarm status using SNMP

Hi,

Is there a way to check if there is an active alarm on a cisco switch/router (M4900/4948 series and 2960 series) using SNMP ?

 

I'm looking for a simple quick way to verify if an alarm is active (any alarm)

is there some sort of general OID that gives me a '1' or '0' ?

 

thanks !

grtz

Thijs

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
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Rising star

Like a table that hold all alarms. No  there is no such thing.

There are so many reasons there could be an alarm. Hardware state, error rates, utilisation, etc

There are hardware state OID's that can give you a hardware component status.

Usually you will find that you have an OID for a component, like a fan.

1.3.6.1.4.1.9.9.13.1.4.1.3

You can then walk this OID to find the instances of that OID.

E.g, a fan for the device and another fan for the power supply, or a fan for each stack member.

When you know these instances lets say the walk return .1001and .2004 you can query

1.3.6.1.4.1.9.9.13.1.4.1.3.1001 and 1.3.6.1.4.1.9.9.13.1.4.1.3.2004.

The values returned can be:

Specific Object Information
ObjectciscoEnvMonFanState
OID1.3.6.1.4.1.9.9.13.1.4.1.3
TypeCiscoEnvMonState
1:normal
2:warning
3:critical
4:shutdown
5:notPresent
6:notFunctioning
Permissionread-only
Statuscurrent
MIBCISCO-ENVMON-MIB ;   -   View Supporting Images this link will generate a new window
DescriptionThe current state of the fan being instrumented.

 

So then you have an alarm for the fan's.

It is similar for other components like a power supply or temperature sensors, etc.

http://tools.cisco.com/Support/SNMP/do/BrowseMIB.do?local=en&step=2&mibName=CISCO-ENVMON-MIB

 

And then there are operational alarms not related to hardware.

 

For this you need to monitor values like CPU utilization and define a threshold.

 

Good luck,

 

Michel

 

 

View solution in original post

2 REPLIES 2
Highlighted
Rising star

Like a table that hold all alarms. No  there is no such thing.

There are so many reasons there could be an alarm. Hardware state, error rates, utilisation, etc

There are hardware state OID's that can give you a hardware component status.

Usually you will find that you have an OID for a component, like a fan.

1.3.6.1.4.1.9.9.13.1.4.1.3

You can then walk this OID to find the instances of that OID.

E.g, a fan for the device and another fan for the power supply, or a fan for each stack member.

When you know these instances lets say the walk return .1001and .2004 you can query

1.3.6.1.4.1.9.9.13.1.4.1.3.1001 and 1.3.6.1.4.1.9.9.13.1.4.1.3.2004.

The values returned can be:

Specific Object Information
ObjectciscoEnvMonFanState
OID1.3.6.1.4.1.9.9.13.1.4.1.3
TypeCiscoEnvMonState
1:normal
2:warning
3:critical
4:shutdown
5:notPresent
6:notFunctioning
Permissionread-only
Statuscurrent
MIBCISCO-ENVMON-MIB ;   -   View Supporting Images this link will generate a new window
DescriptionThe current state of the fan being instrumented.

 

So then you have an alarm for the fan's.

It is similar for other components like a power supply or temperature sensors, etc.

http://tools.cisco.com/Support/SNMP/do/BrowseMIB.do?local=en&step=2&mibName=CISCO-ENVMON-MIB

 

And then there are operational alarms not related to hardware.

 

For this you need to monitor values like CPU utilization and define a threshold.

 

Good luck,

 

Michel

 

 

View solution in original post

Highlighted
Rising star

Like a table that hold all alarms. No  there is no such thing.

There are so many reasons there could be an alarm. Hardware state, error rates, utilisation, etc

There are hardware state OID's that can give you a hardware component status.

Usually you will find that you have an OID for a component, like a fan.

1.3.6.1.4.1.9.9.13.1.4.1.3

You can then walk this OID to find the instances of that OID.

E.g, a fan for the device and another fan for the power supply, or a fan for each stack member.

When you know these instances lets say the walk return .1001and .2004 you can query

1.3.6.1.4.1.9.9.13.1.4.1.3.1001 and 1.3.6.1.4.1.9.9.13.1.4.1.3.2004.

The values returned can be:

Specific Object Information
ObjectciscoEnvMonFanState
OID1.3.6.1.4.1.9.9.13.1.4.1.3
TypeCiscoEnvMonState
1:normal
2:warning
3:critical
4:shutdown
5:notPresent
6:notFunctioning
Permissionread-only
Statuscurrent
MIBCISCO-ENVMON-MIB ;   -   View Supporting Images this link will generate a new window
DescriptionThe current state of the fan being instrumented.

 

So then you have an alarm for the fan's.

It is similar for other components like a power supply or temperature sensors, etc.

http://tools.cisco.com/Support/SNMP/do/BrowseMIB.do?local=en&step=2&mibName=CISCO-ENVMON-MIB

 

And then there are operational alarms not related to hardware.

 

For this you need to monitor values like CPU utilization and define a threshold.

 

Good luck,

 

Michel

 

 

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