cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
cancel
410
Views
0
Helpful
3
Replies
Highlighted

Applying WAN changes remotely?

Say I have a router with one external WAN interface and it's through this interface that I'm connecting remotely to make changes. Now imagine I need to change the external IP address of this WAN interface or change the speed/duplex settings etc. What I normally do in this situation is instead make the changes in a txt document and load it onto the router's startup configuration and then simply reboot the router so it loads the new configuration with the new IP details.

Is there a better way to do this? For example could I setup a change off the routers configuration but not have it apply those changes until a certain time and all at the same time.

So if I wanted to change WAN IP, DUPLEX, SPEED etc I could do program the changes but not have them actioned until a certain time and at the same time?

Thanks


Andrew

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Highlighted

Disclaimer

The Author of this posting offers the information contained within this posting without consideration and with the reader's understanding that there's no implied or expressed suitability or fitness for any purpose. Information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as rendering professional advice of any kind. Usage of this posting's information is solely at reader's own risk.

Liability Disclaimer

In no event shall Author be liable for any damages whatsoever (including, without limitation, damages for loss of use, data or profit) arising out of the use or inability to use the posting's information even if Author has been advised of the possibility of such damage.

Posting

Yup. that's it.  If the startup config already matches the current running config, there's no need to save it again.  (On later devices, I use sh arc con dif nvram:startup-config system:running-config to confirm that's the case, and if not, to see what's different.)

Remember, the temp.txt file doesn't have to be a complete config, it only requires your changes (much like conf term).

View solution in original post

3 REPLIES 3
Highlighted
VIP Expert

Disclaimer

The   Author of this posting offers the information contained within this   posting without consideration and with the reader's understanding that   there's no implied or expressed suitability or fitness for any purpose.   Information provided is for informational purposes only and should not   be construed as rendering professional advice of any kind. Usage of  this  posting's information is solely at reader's own risk.

Liability Disclaimer

In   no event shall Author be liable for any damages whatsoever (including,   without limitation, damages for loss of use, data or profit) arising  out  of the use or inability to use the posting's information even if  Author  has been advised of the possibility of such damage.

Posting

A method I've used is somewhat similar to your loading a new startup config and rebooting into it.  Instead of loading a new startup config, I load a file of config changes to the device's local flash and then copy it to the running config.  (As the commands are applied locally, they can make changes that will temporarily drop your remote connection.)  This method allows me to first schedule a reload before I do the copy.  If everything goes well, I cancel the reload. If not, the scheduled reload puts the device back to its original config.

As to sceduling changes at some time, you could use your method with scheduled reloads.  Similar might be accomplished with my method if you can schedule a script to run at a certain time.

Highlighted

That's a good idea. Essentialy I would do as follows:

Save the running configuration to startup, then load a new configuration onto the router eg temp.txt

Schedule a reload of the router for around 5 minutes from present. Then copy temp.txt to running config. If it works I can then jump back onto the router and save to startup and cancel reload, if it fails however then the router will reboot in 5 minutes and reload it's original startup-config.

Is that right?

Thanks

Highlighted

Disclaimer

The Author of this posting offers the information contained within this posting without consideration and with the reader's understanding that there's no implied or expressed suitability or fitness for any purpose. Information provided is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as rendering professional advice of any kind. Usage of this posting's information is solely at reader's own risk.

Liability Disclaimer

In no event shall Author be liable for any damages whatsoever (including, without limitation, damages for loss of use, data or profit) arising out of the use or inability to use the posting's information even if Author has been advised of the possibility of such damage.

Posting

Yup. that's it.  If the startup config already matches the current running config, there's no need to save it again.  (On later devices, I use sh arc con dif nvram:startup-config system:running-config to confirm that's the case, and if not, to see what's different.)

Remember, the temp.txt file doesn't have to be a complete config, it only requires your changes (much like conf term).

View solution in original post