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Beginner

Host directly into router could connect to lower router / vlan just via subinterfaces?

topology.PNG

I am trying to see how flexible vlans can be between routers.

Would it make sense to have a host, that is connected DIRECTLY to a router (PC11, in picture > ) to be able to be considered part of a VLAN that is was created on a switch outside of the subnetwork ( as seen below )

PC2 is connected to switch2 and functions properly on its vlan.

Is there a way to create the subinterfaces from switch2 to router3, up to router8 and "imply" that PC11 is on VLAN10, as well, just via subinterfaces and vlan databases within the routers? I'm still struggling with the basic of subinterfaces so forgive me, if this is way in left field. Bugging people and making my thoughts loud helps me learn a lot.

My real question is:

Is it possible to do this without using a switch to connect my single host (PC211) to the router8?

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

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You are asking an interesting question but I am having problems understanding some of your details. Let us start with the most important detail which is that your drawing shows the routers connected by serial interface. vlan information is propagated over Ethernet interfaces but not over serial interfaces. So as drawn your routers can not share van information. Revise your physical topology or revise your question and we will try to answer it.

 

HTH

 

Rick

HTH

Rick

View solution in original post

6 REPLIES 6
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Beginner

Could I manually create routs from Router3's sub-interface to Router8's sub interface and then create an ACL permitting all traffic from VLAN10 to PC11?

 

 

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Or is the VLAN separation still by it's nature, sanctioned, so that no matter, it will need an actual switch to designate it's relationship with my vlan10?

Highlighted

You are asking an interesting question but I am having problems understanding some of your details. Let us start with the most important detail which is that your drawing shows the routers connected by serial interface. vlan information is propagated over Ethernet interfaces but not over serial interfaces. So as drawn your routers can not share van information. Revise your physical topology or revise your question and we will try to answer it.

 

HTH

 

Rick

HTH

Rick

View solution in original post

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Gotchya. That answers another question I would of had in the future.. ( can vlans exist between WANs). I'm going to toy with it a little more and get more familiar via router on stick topology before trying to work between two routers. Thank you.

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I am glad that my response was helpful. Thank you for marking this question as solved. This will help other participants in the community to identify discussions that have helpful information.

 

I am not sure what your follow up question is asking. Certainly it is possible to have two WANs be connected by a vlan.

 

In a broader sense vlans make the most sense when we are talking about switches. Routers do have the ability to connect a router interface to a switch trunk port and to process the multiple vlans (with their vlan tagging). It makes less sense to talk about vlans on a router without a switch.

 

HTH

 

Rick

HTH

Rick
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