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Phoenix47
Beginner

How to choose switch/router model?

Hi everyone! My name is Leonid, I have a question. Cisco produces a wide range of devices (switches, routers etc) with different hardware and feature-sets for a wide range of purposes. And when, for example, a large ISP needs an MPLS-switch, I'm sure, there is always somebody expert in choosing suitable model, hardware, feature-set with a lowest possible price, exactly for the purpose. 

So please, does anybody know, how this business (profession) is called, how to learn it and maybe there is a certification line for this kind of knowledge? Or it is always just an experience??

Thank you!

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Joseph W. Doherty
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The business profession might be called, from the vendor's side, pre-sales, advanced sales or sales.  Basically, vendors often have staff to help customers meet their business requirements using the vendor's products.  I suspect vendors provide training.

From the customer side, especially when dealing with large/expensive network platforms, your more experienced engineers and/or "network architects" determine the business needs and select equipment. The customer's folk ofter work with vendor's folk in selecting equipment, again, especially for larger/expensive products.

People resources, allocated for these tasks, are often proportional to the cost of the equipment.  For example, Cisco won't help you much in selecting and purchasing a single 800 series router.  Nor will most businesses have a principal engineer or network architect involved in such a process.  However, if you need to buy 10,000 800 series routers, or a CRS-3, both vendors and businesses tend to invest more in people resources to "get-it-right".