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ping -c possible in PT? and best video resource from basics.

marianodaniel
Level 1
Level 1

Hello, I'm starting with PT. Thing is, I wanna start from the very basic (learning to read the PDUs properly, analysing them and simply learning more about the very core), however, one of the very problems I find, is that when running a ping from one host to another (let's say from a PC to another PC), it sends the typical windows 4 packet ping. I want to do a ping -c 1 in order to simply send that one packet and see it back and forth, but I can't. The Windows cmd prompt simulation does not allow for -c flag. How can I do this?

The only option I can think is simply interrupt the ping with ctrl + c when the packet is sent, but will that be effective/accurate?

 

Also, do you know of any videos that provide full blown explanation on how to use PT to a deeper level (packet PDU, etc etc) from a beginner's point of view? All I found is videos where they teach you the basics, but not how to analyse each packet and it's conformation.

 

Thanks in advance!

1 Accepted Solution

Accepted Solutions

Martin L
VIP
VIP

Windows OS and Cisco Packet Tracer PC Ping uses -n option , not -c.  Use ? in CMD if u not sure about command options

Usage: ping [-n count | -v TOS | -t ] target

2, You can try advanced ping option, aka custom ping, that look like open a letter icon.  Those are in 2nd from the top row of PT GUI Window section.  PDU ping Tool ends on Add Simple PDU, Add Advanced PDU, or custom PDU.  Also, send a ping and switch to Sim mode of PT while you doing ping.

3, Note that If they do not allow something, you do not have any options.  you cannot do anything (any command options). PT is just a simulator, not real thing for both Windows machine and Cisco IOS behavior.

Regards, ML
**Please Rate All Helpful Responses **

 

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5 Replies 5

Joseph W. Doherty
Hall of Fame
Hall of Fame

Unfortunately, my knowledge of PT doesn't extend to using it for packet analysis, which I believe it supports to some degree (have you done the PT course?), but I write to ask why you believe receiving 4 (alike) packets rather than 1 packet would impede packet analysis?

Hello @Joseph W. Doherty and thank you for your reply! I think my opening statement best explains the reason why I believe this is the case: " I wanna start from the very basic". 

I never said it would impede packet analysis, however I believe seeing only one packet coming and going would be much easier to analyse than a bunch of them. Simple logic.

 

"I never said it would impede packet analysis, however I believe seeing only one packet coming and going would be much easier to analyse than a bunch of them. Simple logic."

Laugh, yes you did not write"impede", and I didn't quote you doing so, and you now write, it's "simple logic" analysis of just a single packet is "much easier".

Well, one definition of "impede" is "retard".  For example, I might say walking through mud may impede your progress, i.e. more difficult or not as easy?  So, I don't think the word "impede" is way off the mark.

As to your it's "simple logic" examination of having only a single is "much easier", well, okay, we might also say beauty is in the eye of the beholder.  If only having one packet to examine makes it easier, for you, that's fine!  Learning the basics lays the foundation for follow-up learning.

I'll note, likely as you learn the contents of a packet, you may want to see a series of related packets, to see how packet contents change.  When you really learn more about packets, you may then discover what a series of related packets show us is often more important than the contents of any one packet.  There are good reasons why ping defaults to sending multiple packets.  (Don't misunderstand, there's nothing wrong with you only wanting to receive a single packet, for analysis, but, soon [?], you should learn to work with receiving multiple packets.)

Hopefully, from @Martin L post, you now know how to have ping, in PT, send the number of packets you desire.

Similarly, besides learning how to vary the number of packets ping sends, you should learn about ping's many other options, which can be very useful for network trouble shooting, with or without packet captures.

 

Martin L
VIP
VIP

Windows OS and Cisco Packet Tracer PC Ping uses -n option , not -c.  Use ? in CMD if u not sure about command options

Usage: ping [-n count | -v TOS | -t ] target

2, You can try advanced ping option, aka custom ping, that look like open a letter icon.  Those are in 2nd from the top row of PT GUI Window section.  PDU ping Tool ends on Add Simple PDU, Add Advanced PDU, or custom PDU.  Also, send a ping and switch to Sim mode of PT while you doing ping.

3, Note that If they do not allow something, you do not have any options.  you cannot do anything (any command options). PT is just a simulator, not real thing for both Windows machine and Cisco IOS behavior.

Regards, ML
**Please Rate All Helpful Responses **

 

Thank you!

 

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